Cithaeron


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Cithaeron

(sĭthē`rən), Gr. Kithairón, mountain range, c.10 mi (16 km) long, central Greece, between Boeotia in the north and Attica in the south. It rises to 4,623 ft (1,409 m). The range was the scene of many events in Greek mythology and was especially sacred to Dionysius.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cithaeron. There are the chorus, women Maenads, who have been initiated into his rites, and so do not resist him.
Many years before, he explains, while "in charge of mountain flocks" he "found" the abandoned infant Oedipus upon "Cithaeron's slopes / in the twisting thickets" (1026-27), "loosed" his "pierced and fettered" feet (1034), and carried him to the childless Polybus and Merope in Corinth as a "gift ...
As far as the basic sequence of events are concerned (Oedipus is abandoned on Mt Cithaeron as a baby; he is rescued by a shepherd; he grows up in Corinth; he kills Laius at the crossroads; and so on), it is reasonable to assume that Sophocles conceived this sequence before setting it on paper with various artistic devi ces.
Comparable is the story known from a fragment of Plutarch according to which Zeus abducted the maiden Hera and Cithaeron, presumably the mountain of that name, provided as a natural bedroom a `shady recess', another location removed from spying eyes and protected by secrecy (Fr.
Amphion is the son of Antiope by Zeus; dragged from his mother and exposed on Mount Cithaeron, he avenged her, built the walls of Thebes, and became king.
The passage as a whole illustrates the power of song: the previous examples have been Orpheus taming beasts and stopping rivers (3-4) and Amphion animating the stones of Cithaeron to create Thebes (5-6).
Cithaeron, first pinning the baby's ankles together (hence the name Oedipus, meaning Swell-Foot).
The journey that Sophocles narrates, from the pathless hillside of Cithaeron, where an infant whose ankles have been pierced is left to die, to the grove of the Furies in sight of the hill of Demeter at Colonus, where the aged, blinded Oedipus is taken to his death, is in many ways the key narrative of manhood in the western tradition (Sophocles c.442-406 b.c.e.).
Becoming cruel, ruthless, and cunning, he establishes control over the mind of Pentheus and leads him, disguised as a woman, through the streets of Thebes to Cithaeron, where he is torn apart by the maddened women of his own city, led by Pentheus' mother, Agave.
While fleeing to Sicyon, she gave birth to twins, Amphion and Zethus, on Mount Cithaeron. They were raised by shepherds and, on reaching manhood, learned of their mother's fate.
up to the heights of Cithaeron. For it is to these places that the approaching god points (Holderlin 2004, 321).
Cithaeron. Rescued by a shepherd, the boy was raised by the childless king Polybus of Corinth and his wife, Periboea (or Merope), as their own son.