Civilian Conservation Corps


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Civilian Conservation Corps

(CCC), established in 1933 by the U.S. Congress as a measure of the New Deal program. The CCC provided work and vocational training for unemployed single young men through conserving and developing the country's natural resources. At its peak in 1935, the organization had more than 500,000 members in over 2,600 camps. These were usually operated by the War Dept., but the men were not subject to military control. In 1939 the CCC was made part of the Federal Security Agency. Beginning in 1940, greater emphasis was placed on projects aiding national defense. Against President Franklin D. Roosevelt's request, Congress abolished the CCC in 1942.
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"It's steep," she admitted, "but enjoyable." Back at the top, before driving back downhill, we took the 0.2-mile Whispering Spruce Trail loop, passing through the west shelter built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. With the endless shimmering ocean before us, we felt as if we were on top of the world.
Critique: An impressive and seminal work of original and painstaking research which is strongly recommended for community and academic library 20th Century American History collections, "The Civilian Conservation Corps in Southern Illinois, 1933-1942" is exceptionally well written, organized and presented.
Continue reading "A Generation of Jewish Men Joined FDR's Civilian Conservation Corps During the Depression" at...
The Civilian Conservation Corps did more than simply make room for new monuments.
Set to debut on DVD January 5, the collection will include the following five films: The Crash of 1929, The Civilian Conservation Corps, Hoover Dam, Surviving the Dust Bowl, and Seabiscuit.
The Civilian Conservation Corps was founded by President Franklin Roosevelt during the Great Depression, in the 1930s.
For example Boudreau looking for work mentions the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and praises the new president Franklin Roosevelt.
Another Day, Another Dollar: The Civilian Conservation Corps in the Catskills
Some 30,000 Reserve officers commanded or served at the 2,700 camps of the Civilian Conservation Corps during the 1930s.
While WITH PICKS, SHOVELS AND HOPE: THE CCC AND ITS LEGACY ON THE COLORADO PLATEAU will likely be a top pick for Colorado libraries, any interested in public lands management, Depression-era history, or the Civilian Conservation Corps will find this a key historical guide.
But Moss's father is an unemployed drunk, he discovers, and so Moss ends up signing up for a hitch with the Civilian Conservation Corps in Montana so that he at least can have a roof over his head and send some money home to Ma.
One of President Theodore Roosevelt's New Deal programs, the Civilian Conservation Corps, placed young men in barracks and military-style organizations to work in national forests and participate in other outdoor projects.

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