Claggart

Claggart

dislikes Billy Budd so that he falsely accuses him of fomenting mutiny. [Am. Lit: Herman Melville Billy Budd]
See: Hatred
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The cast worked heroically, with Brindley Sherratt a Hagen-like Claggart and Alan Oke visibly tormented as Captain Vere.
La belleza y bondad del joven, cuyo unico defecto es una tartamudez paralizante, suscitan la envidia y el encono de Claggart, el maestro en armas encargado de mantener la disciplina en ese buque de su Majestad Britanica.
Brindley Sherratt's Claggart emphasized anger rather than the sinister side of the depraved master-at-arms, and was somewhat lacking in destructive power.
An absolute high spot comes when Claggart, the master-at-arms, sings with sonorous intensity of a desire for destruction, clearly based on the impossible desires aroused by Billy, which is so instinctive that he cannot explain it.
This inspires the hatred of the master at arms, John Claggart, whose attempts to disgrace Billy speedily bring tragedy for both of them.
Los personajes principales son tres: Billy Budd, marinero de 21 anos de edad, John Claggart, maestro de armas de 35 anos y Edward Vere, capitan de 40 anos.
Billy explains that he struck Claggart with a fatal blow when the latter falsely accused Billy of mutiny, because Billy could not speak to deny the charge.
With his powerful bass voice, Phillip Ens gives a sinister, compelling portrayal of the malevolent master-at-arms, John Claggart, and as Captain Vere, tenor John Mark Ainsley embodies the opera's conflicted protagonist.
That was Philip Langridge as Vere, Dwayne Croft was Billy, and Jim Morris was Claggart.
Melville knows nothing more about Claggart than Marlowe does about Mrs.
Budd and Claggart represent "two types of reading--Budd's naive or literal tendencies are set against Claggarts ironic incursions, which assume that the relation between sign and meaning can be arbitrary.
As for Pierre's violence against Glendinning Stanly, as I have been implying by way of underscoring his being utterly bereft of language by the hegemonic discourse of Saddle Meadows, it is, we might say without distortion, not unlike Billy Budd's speechless blow that kills the master-at-arms Claggart in Billy Budd, (40) the "pure" (anomic) or "divine" or "revolutionary" violence that Walter Benjamin distinguishes from "juridical" or "mythic" violence in his critique of Carl Schmitt's decisionist concept of sovereignty.