Clare


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Clare,

county (1991 pop. 90,918), 1,231 sq mi (3,188 sq km), W Republic of Ireland, between Galway Bay and the Shannon River. The county and Roman Catholic seat is Ennis. The terrain is broken and hilly, with many bogs and lakes; the coastline is especially rugged. Fishing is important, and sheep, cattle, and poultry are raised. Chief crops are oats and potatoes. Major industrial development occurred in the 1960s and 70s, including the creation of a large hydroelectric power station on the Shannon River. Ireland's main airport, the Shannon International Airport, is located near Ennis. Clare is an area laden with prehistoric ruins and ancient Christian sites.

Clare

1
1. Anthony (Ward). born 1942, Irish psychiatrist and broadcaster; presenter of the radio series In the Psychiatrist's Chair from 1982
2. John. 1793--1864, English poet, noted for his descriptions of country life, particularly in The Shepherd's Calendar (1827) and The Rural Muse (1835). He was confined in a lunatic asylum from 1837

Clare

2
a county of W Republic of Ireland, in Munster between Galway Bay and the Shannon estuary. County town: Ennis. Pop.: 103 277 (2002). Area: 3188 sq. km (1231 sq. miles)
References in classic literature ?
For several days after Tess's arrival Clare, sitting abstractedly reading from some book, periodical, or piece of music just come by post, hardly noticed that she was present at table.
She soon finished her eating, and having a consciousness that Clare was regarding her, began to trace imaginary patterns on the tablecloth with her forefinger with the constraint of a domestic animal that perceives itself to be watched.
Francis Clare had hitherto remained modestly in the background.
Clare was in foul need of money, and mountains of it.
Clare was a hell-hound, but he was a hound of breed.
Clare, the silver head bowed, the silver sword broken.
Clares quarrelled with that family, and began publishing a violent series of articles, in which he said that the late general was a religious maniac; but as far as the tale went, this seemed to mean little more than a religious man.
Clare distributed small pieces of change among them.
Clare turned to go back his eye fell upon Tom, who was standing uneasily, shifting from one foot to the other, while Adolph stood negligently leaning against the banisters, examining Tom through an opera-glass, with an air that would have done credit to any dandy living.
Clare to his wife, "I've bought you a coachman, at last, to order.
Clare, "show Tom down stairs; and, mind yourself," he added; "remember what I told you.
Clare, seating himself on a stool beside her sofa, "be gracious, and say something pretty to a fellow.