geostationary orbit

(redirected from Clarke orbit)
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geostationary orbit

(jee-oh-stay -shŏ-nair-ee) See geosynchronous orbit.
References in periodicals archive ?
So thorougly is he considered the father of the telecommunications satellite that most satellites today travel in what is known as "Clarke orbit," another term for the geostationary orbit, 22,300 miles above the surface of the earth, in which satellites circle at the same speed as the rotation of the Earth.
In fact, geosynchronous orbits, which keep satellites in a fixed position relative to the ground, are called Clarke orbits.
Where now many satellites serve us in Clarke orbits, a thousand years in the future Clarke sees most of humanity living in a giant geostationary ring, hanging 35,900 km above the Earth and linked with three gigantic towerlike space elevators.