clastic sediment


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clastic sediment

[′klas·tik ′sed·ə·mənt]
(geology)
Deposits of clastic materials transported by mechanical agents. Also known as mechanical sediment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The composition of clastic sediments is highly dependent on the nature of the basement, but modulated by tectonic activity and climate conditions that define the denudation regime (Johnsson, 1993).
Low-disturbance and recent accumulation rates of bulk sediments, non-carbonate clastic sediments and phosphorus in study lakes.
Basu (eds.), Processes Controlling the Composition of Clastic Sediments. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 284: 247-261.
Depositional mechanisms form the size analysis of clastic sediments. Journal of Sedementary Petrology, 34: 73-83.
This work culls and reorganizes information from a series of proprietary internal reports from a research project at Exxon Production Research Company that examined techniques and methods for obtaining accurate hydrocarbon formation evaluation results in thinly betted clastic reservoirs (clastic sediments are made up of fragments of preexisting rocks).
Apalone fossils were recovered from clastic sediments of variable grain size, including middle and coarse sands and fine conglomerates.
Charles to Kansas City, crossing notable karst in Ordovician and Mississippian carbonate rocks, into Pennsylvanian strata that is primarily clastic sediments with few karst features.
Following the opening of the South Atlantic, vast quantities of clastic sediments were poured into the delta giving rise to three main rock units which are partially time equivalents and were deposited as prograded wedges.
Geologic mapping of the surficial geology of the Northville 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle shows that the Defiance moraine is composed of a stratified monoclinal sequence of Upper Pleistocene clastic sediments divisible, in ascending order, into three informal units: (1) interbedded alluvium and diamicton; (2) diamicton; and (3) alluvium.
1971) recognises 2 principal units in these sediments: deposits of coarse clastic sediments and limestone.
We know from studies of orogenic belts on land that they contain large volumes of highly disrupted and deformed clastic sediments (mostly turbidites) with minor amounts of apparently interlayered basalts, cherts, and tuffs.
This feature is the northernmost exposure of Oligocene and Miocene clastic sediments which originated as part of an accretionary prism (Fig.