clathrate

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clathrate

[′klath‚rāt]
(biology)
(chemistry)
An inclusion compound in which the guest species is enclosed on all sides by the species forming the crystal lattice. Also known as cage compound; inclusion compound.
(geochemistry)
(petrology)
Pertaining to a condition, chiefly in leucite rock, in which clear leucite crystals are surrounded by tangential leucite crystals to give the rock an appearance of a net or a section of sponge. Also known as enclosure compound.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Spectroscopic analysis in Type I inclusions confirms the presence of vapor C[O.sub.2] and probably of N2, which was responsible for the gas hydrates (clathrates) formation in the cooling routines (Fig 8A).
Because water is also observed in this region, perhaps the material making up the bladed terrain is a methane clathrate. A clathrate is a structure in which a primary molecular species (say water, or H2O) forms a crystalline 'cage' to contain a guest molecule (methane or CH4, for example.).
As Arctic seas, lakes, and tundra continue to warm, and more and more permafrost melts, scientists are not certain precisely how quickly methane and carbon dioxide from permafrost and clathrates will reach dangerous levels.
This could occur if methane is produced faster than it is converted into clathrates. A second possibility is that methane clathrates from the ocean are dragged along into the erupting plumes and release their methane as they rise, like bubbles forming in a popped bottle of champagne.
To examine the composition of gas in the clathrate phase of the samples, synthesized hydrates were decomposed under the temperature of 278 K and pressure of 0.1 MPa.
MacDonald, "Role of methane clathrates in past and future climates," Climatic Change, vol.
The consequent heating of the Arctic environment may release methane from undersea clathrates and increase the already significant release from permafrost.
If large amounts of methane are also released from clathrates on the ocean floor, catastrophe is likely.
Topics include bulk nanocomposites of thermoelectric materials, thermoelectric inverse clathrates, polymer thermoelectric materials, heat dissipaters, and medical applications.
Since TBA forms clathrates in bulk water at X[x.sub.TBA] = 0.05 (Iwasaki and Fujiyama, 1977, 1979), the referred maximum was formerly ascribed to the presence of these structures at the interface.
for viable gas storage media, clathrates may offer an

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