clathrate

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clathrate

[′klath‚rāt]
(biology)
(chemistry)
An inclusion compound in which the guest species is enclosed on all sides by the species forming the crystal lattice. Also known as cage compound; inclusion compound.
(geochemistry)
(petrology)
Pertaining to a condition, chiefly in leucite rock, in which clear leucite crystals are surrounded by tangential leucite crystals to give the rock an appearance of a net or a section of sponge. Also known as enclosure compound.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the Tartarus Dorsa bladed region is comprised of methane clathrates, then the next question would be, "how were the clathrates placed there and where did they come from?
If we persist in continuously adding more and more greenhouse gas to the atmosphere, we will, at some point, reach Arctic temperatures that will cause thousands of square miles of permafrost and shallow clathrates to thaw.
We didn't expect that our study of clathrates in the Enceladus ocean would lead us to the idea that methane is actively being produced by hydrothermal processes," said lead author Alexis Bouquet, a graduate student at the University of Texas at San Antonio.
dissociation] of the simple hydrate of the mixture component, the higher its concentration in the clathrate phase.
Hence, the primary maximum might probably be caused by the presence of clathrate structures at the interface, as formerly proposed by Glinski et al.
Gas clathrate hydrates are inclusion compounds formed of
In the other scenario, the methane is still trapped, but this time it's locked inside little molecular cages called clathrates.
During Martian summer, the increased sunlight striking the icy clathrates directly liberates the trapped methane.
Less certain is the possibility of runaway positive feedback effects from, for example, the release of massive amounts of methane from permafrost and marine clathrates buried under the ocean floor [Flannery (2005)].
A vast amount of methane (an estimated 20 million trillion cubic metres worldwide) is trapped in permafrost ice and undersea sediments in a form known as methane hydrates or clathrates.
An even worse case, a seaquake that massively releases methane clathrates from the deep seabed could overpower all the carbon dioxide emission cuts.
In addition to these and the igneous Martian meteorites, many other rocks and minerals are suspected and/or known to be present on the Martian surface or in its interior, including ices and clathrates, carbonates, and other volcanic and magmatic rocks not represented by the SNC meteorites.

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