clause

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clause

Clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a predicate.
There are two main types of clauses: independent clauses, which can function independently as sentences, and dependent clauses, which depend on an independent clause to form a sentence.
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clause

Law a section of a legal document such as a contract, will, or draft statute

Clause

 

a technical legal term used to denote:

(1) Each individual provision or condition in such documents as constitutions, statutes, declarations, laws, treaties, resolutions, and instructions.

(2) In the narrow sense, a special provision or reservation attached to a treaty.

clause

[klȯz]
(computer science)
A part of a statement in the COBOL language which may describe the structure of an elementary item, give initial values to items in independent and group work areas, or redefine data previously defined by another clause.

clause

In the AIA documents, a subdivision of a subparagraph, identified by four numerals, e.g., 3.3.10.1.

clause

(logic)
A logical formula in conjunctive normal form, which has the schema

p1 ^ ...^ pm => q1 V ... V qn.

or, equivalently,

~p1 V ... V ~pn V q1 V ... V qn,

where pi and qi are atoms.

The operators ~, ^, V, => are connectives, where ~ stands for negation, ^ for conjunction, V for disjunction and => for implication.

clause

(grammar)
A part of a sentence (or programming language statement) that does not constitute a full sentence, e.g. an adjectival clause in human language or a WHERE clause in a SQL statement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nasir, who was earlier banned for one year by PCB for violating clause 2.
Linguists analytically describe aspects of relative pronouns and relative clauses in 11 of the languages spoken in Cameroon in west Central Africa.
presents a persuasive argument why Florida law should allow nonreliance clauses to exclude fraud claims.
Although the Court went into exceptional detail about the similarities and differences between the FCC and its neighboring clauses, it neglected to rationalize why it chose the Interstate Commerce Clause framework over that of the Indian Commerce Clause.
An example in the United States of a case involving non-compete clauses is Oltrin Solutions, LLC's purchase of a customer list from JCI Jones Chemicals Inc.
The findings indicated that children aged 10 and 14 reformulated relative clauses with a relative clause significantly more than 6-year-olds did.
Multi-step clauses require parties to first negotiate and/or mediate in a quick and cost-effective manner before proceeding to arbitration.
Benedicte Guillaume's study, A Corpus-Based Study of Since Clauses in Contemporary English, is an analysis of the subordinator since, introducing both causal and temporal clauses in contemporary English, based on a selection of more than 500 occurrences extracted from its almost 26 000 uses listed in the British National Corpus.
No-contest clauses will prevent most frivolous attempts to overturn a trust, but there is one key exception: The Uniform Probate Code ensures that a no-contest clause is unenforceable if probable cause exists for contesting the will.
The Court of Appeal rejected this argument and highlighted that the court was not allowed to apply liquidated damages clauses after the termination of a contract.