Clausthal-Zellerfeld


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Clausthal-Zellerfeld

(klous`täl-tsĕl`ərfĕlt), town, Lower Saxony, central Germany, a resort in the Harz Mts. Its manufactures include textiles and wood products. The town was once a center for the mining of copper, zinc, and lead ores.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(4) Institute of Energy Research and Physical Technologies, Clausthal University of Technology, Leibnizstrafie 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany
The specific surface area and particle size distribution of CFBC desulfurized slag under different grinding times were tested using the HELOS-RODOS (Sympatec GmbH Co., Ltd., Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany), as shown in Table 2.
Mathematiker, Professor fur Endlagersysteme an derTechnischen Universitat Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld. Sprecher des Verbundprojekts ENTRIA.
W., "Zyklisches Werkstoffverhalten bei konstanter und variabler Beanspruchungsamplitude," Dissertation, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Papierflieger, 2007.
Gerhard Ziegmann (University of Technology, PuK, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany) and Dipl.-Ing.
(2) Institute of Energy Research and Physical Technologies, Clausthal University of Technology and Energy Research Center of Lower Saxony, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany
Technical Report, IfI-08-09, Technische Universitat Clausthal, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld Germany.
Weilbeer, Efficient Numerical Methods for Fractional Differential Equations and their Analytical Background, Papierflieger, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany, 2006.
Most of the great and famous (and all now extinct) Harz mineral localities--Saint Andreasberg, Bad Grund, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Altenau; the Rammelsberg mine, where mining for silver began in 968 A.D.--lie in the Upper Harz.
nov., see below), negative imprint, both housed at the Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Technical University of Clausthal (Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany); positive imprints of the specimens IGP In 190 (bearing the collector number F 15) and IGP In 191 (bearing the collector number F 51) are temporarily housed in Michael Sowiak's private collection (Glandorf, Germany); both specimens were discovered by the amateur palaeontologist Michael Sowiak.