Clayton Act


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Clayton Act

 

a US antitrust act adopted by Congress and signed by President W. Wilson on Oct. 15, 1914.

The act was named for the author of the bill, H. Clayton. It was designed to restrict the activity of trusts and to create the Federal Trade Commission to control them. The act formally released labor and farmer organizations from the prosecutions to which they had been subjected by the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890. However, in practice, judicial prosecution of these groups continued on the basis of other antitrust legislation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Here, however, the evidence did not support a conclusion that Essilors proposed acquisition of Luxottica may be substantially to lessen competition in violation of Section 7 of the Clayton Act.
The verdict was unfavorable to JELD-WEN with respect to Steves' claims that JELD-WEN's 2012 acquisition of CraftMaster violated Section 7 of the Clayton Act and that JELD-WEN breached the supply agreement between the parties.
Justice alleged violation of the Clayton Act, which spells "relevant market" criteria for merger and acquisition review.
The evidence supporting the FTC's complaint shows that the proposed merger would make that situation even worse--a classic case for prohibiting a merger under Section 7 of the Clayton Act.
Amendments in 1976 to the Clayton Act, which prevents mergers and other practices to "substantially reduce" competition, (https://ago.
antitrust laws were established when Congress passed the Sherman Act in 1890 and the Clayton Act in 1914.
Related stories: FTC updates Clayton Act monetary thresholds Escalating Risks for Directors and Officers in Shareholder Derivative Actions Arnold & Porter's Hinchliffe advises on antitrust aspects of GE's Alstom acquisition
FTC is less likely to challenge an act or practice as an unfair method of competition on a standalone basis if enforcement of the Sherman or Clayton Act is sufficient to address the competitive harm arising from the act or practice.
21) Antitrust law is governed by the Clayton Act and the Sherman Antitrust Act, which were enacted to promote and protect competition by ensuring that consumers have access to lower priced goods and more choices.
That wasn't enough, so in 1914, we passed the Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act.
Part 1(1) articulates and explains (A) the specific-anticompetitive-intent test of illegality that the study claims is promulgated by the Sherman Act, the object-branch of the test of illegality promulgated by Article 101(1) of the Treaty of Lisbon, and the exclusionary-abuse branch of the test of illegality promulgated by Article 102 of the Treaty of Lisbon; and (B) the lessening-competition test of illegality that the study claims is promulgated by the Clayton Act, the effect-branch of the test of illegality promulgated by Article 101(1) of the Treaty of Lisbon, and the European Merger Control Regulation; and (2) attempts to justify the study's claims that its operationalizations of those tests of illegality are correct as a matter of law.
the DOJ demonstrated the agencies willingness to pursue merger cases under the Clayton Act, regardless of reportability.