ClearType


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ClearType

A font rendering technology in Windows XP that smooths the edges of diagonal lines and makes text more readable. To turn ClearType on, select Effects in the Appearance tab in the Display control panel, and switch from Standard to ClearType. For more information, visit www.microsoft.com/typography/WhatIsClearType.mspx.


Standard vs. ClearType
Note the smoother appearance in the ClearType example on the bottom.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tablet, touted as alternative to laptops, featured a 12-inch ClearType Full HD display, 4th generation Intel Core i7 processor.
Summary: Microsoft's latest launch, the Surface Pro 3 is encased in magnesium and equipped with a 12-inch ClearType Full HD display, Windows 8.1 Pro, 4th-generation Intel Core processor and up to 8 GB of RAM in a sleek frame with up to nine hours of Web-browsing battery life.
The 12" screen is a ClearType full-HD display with 2,160 X 1,440 resolution in a 3:2 aspect ratio.
The Surface Pro 3 comes with a 12-inch ClearType full-HD display and is powered by a 4th-generation Intel Core processor and up to 8GB of RAM.
Microsoft Surface 2: 10.6-inch TFT Full HD touch screen with ClearType technology (208ppi pixel density)
The display is now a 10.6CC ClearType 1080p display with 5A[degrees]point multiA[degrees]touch support.
For instance, Slattery and Rayner (2010) found a small but significant advantage of using a sharper focus of the letters (via ClearType) relative to the default settings.
This is another area where I don't have any significant complaint about the display on the Surface RT--it is bright and vibrant, and the text is relatively crisp thanks to Microsoft's use of ClearType technology.
The text is displayed using a more precise version of Cleartype that Belfiore called sub-pixel positioning.
In 1998, Microsoft announced the development of ClearType, a technology capable of rendering text at 300 per cent higher resolution than ever before, even on today's low-resolution screens.
What Microsoft didn't say was that the utility, ClearType, was really designed for liquid crystal displays (LCDs)--those newly popular flat screens.