Cleomedes


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cleomedes

(klē'ōmē`dēz, klē'ə–), fl. 2d cent., Greek astronomer. In a treatise on the circular theory of heavenly bodies, he recorded several hypotheses, e.g., the earth's spherical form and the moon's revolutions, which were established by later scientists.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It belongs to Cleomedes' Lectures on Astronomy (or Caelestia).
The Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter provides this view of Cleomedes Crater.
See, e.g., the episode recalled in Pausanias 6.9.6-8 about Cleomedes of Astypalaea, who disappeared while seeking refuge from an angry mob in the sanctuary of Athena: "He entered a chest standing in the sanctuary and drew down the lid.
The closest be comes to answering it is the description of Cleomedes, the fifth-century Olympic victor who miraculously escaped from a closed chest: "It is perhaps because of the exceptional nature of Cleomedes' disappearance that he is the only one of these fabled athletes to be unambiguously called a hero" (41).
But, in its overall features the evidence suggests that Posidonius and Cleomedes differed from their Stoic precursors on this topic.
As the astronomer Cleomedes put it in the second century AD, `Nature likes life, and reason proves that wherever conditions allow it, earth should be inhabited by living beings'.
Between Macrobius and Cleomedes, and continuing on toward the limb, there is a less-regular boundary with dark mare lava near the Wasatch Mountains.
Other dark halos are found in Petavius and Cleomedes, though those in the latter crater are tiny and very difficult to detect.