Cleridae


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Cleridae

[′kler·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The checkered beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Cleroidea.

Cleridae

 

(checkered beetles), a family of beetles. The usually mottled body is 3–25 mm in length. The elytra have red, yellow, black, blue, and white checkerboard designs. Checkered beetles are numerous in the tropics. Of the approximately 3,300 species, 60 species are found in the USSR. Common species are from the genera Thanasimus and Trichodes. Most checkered beetles prey upon other insects. The larvae live in the burrows of wood-boring beetles, in beehives, and in wasp nests; they feed on the larvae of the insects whose homes they have invaded.

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Coleoptera Dermestidae Dermestes maculatus De Geer Cleridae Necrobia rufipes De Geer Lepidoptera Tineidae Tineola sp.
1974, Valerio 1988, Hilje 1996, Kohlmann, 1997, 2000, Escobar and Chacon de Ulloa 2000 Cleridae Rifkind 1997 Languriidae Pakaluk 1988 Cerambycidae Gilmour 1960, 1962, Di Iorio 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997a-b, Gonzalez and Di Iorio 1997 Bruchidae Santos et al.
Staphylinidae was the most abundant family with 2,184 individuals, followed by Histeridae (1,264), Nitidulidae (395), Dermestidae (333), Scarabaeidae (300), Cleridae (120), Carabidae (75) and Trogidae (75), amounting to 97.8% of the specimens.
Three families (Cerambycidae, Cleridae and Coccinellidae) were both more abundant and species rich in the canopy than near the ground, and four other groups (Carabidae, Pselaphinae (Staphylinidae), Scolytinae (Curculionidae) and other Staphylinidae) were both more abundant and species rich near the ground than in the canopy (Tables 4, 5).
5 05-19 to 08-18 Tymnes tricolor (F.) 1 07-07 Ciidae Cis levetti (Casey) 13 04-07 to 08-04 Orthocis punctatus (Mellie) 3 05-12 to 06-09 Cleridae Enoclerus nigripes (Say) 14 09-15 to 11-04 Necrobia rufipes DeGeer 9 06-29 Necrobia violacea L.
The fourth trophic level consists of an assemblage of top predators in several orders; we manipulated the specialist ant-predator Tarsobaenus letourneauae Barr (Coleoptera: Cleridae, formerly Phyllobaenus sp.) (W.
impluviata was accentuated after the fourth instar, when they become more easier targets to predators such as larvae of beetles of the family Cleridae, which accounted for 80% of predation, besides the predation by birds on mature larvae and pupae (Costa et al.