clerihew

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clerihew

a form of comic or satiric verse, consisting of two couplets of metrically irregular lines, containing the name of a well-known person
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Fun, wicked, often brilliant, all of Ingram's one-hundred-plus Clerihews come adorned with a playful sketch by Julia Anderson-Miller.
At times, clerihews combine two real characters that go together like water and cigar smoke.
Despite learning to recognize and enjoy clerihews, it never occurred to me to write one until this past year.
clerihew A light verse quatrain in lines usually of varying length, rhyming aabb, and usually dealing with a person named in the initial rhyme.
CLERIHEWS by Khadim Hussain (Quoin Publishing, pounds 3.99) is available from the Evening Gazette office, Teesside Archives, Waterstone's in Middlesbrough, Dorman Museum, and the Boro programme shop on Parliament Road, Middlesbrough.
Rollin Stearns' fine article on clerihews in this issue reintroduces the term to new readers.
The last section, entitled "Addendum: Academic Graffiti," contains humorous clerihews, notably about literary figures.
The poem can be found in Wilson's Night Thoughts (Farrar, Straus & Cudahy), a curious collection of anagrams, limericks, clerihews, and whimsical excursions that should be on every logophile's bookshelf.
The topics include limericks, clerihews, and alphabet sentences, among other things.
It is merely a segue to these final poems: RED, WHITE AND BLUE CLERIHEWS (with one atrocious sight rhyme) Eric the Red Discovered America, it's said (Or was it the other one, His son?) E.B.
British journalist and man of letters who is remembered as the inventor of the clerihew and as the author of Trent's Last Case (1913), a classic detective story.
The clerihew, a four-line poem with an AABB rhyme scheme, usually begins with the name of a famous person on the first line.