client

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client

1. a customer
2. a person who is registered with or receiving services or financial aid from a welfare agency
3. Computing a program or work station that requests data or information from a server

Client

The person or organization who has a need for a project; responsible for the overall financing of the work and directly or indirectly employs the entire design and building team.

client

[′klī·ənt]
(computer science)
A hardware or software entity that requests shared services from a server.

client

(programming)
A computer system or process that requests a service of another computer system or process (a "server") using some kind of protocol and accepts the server's responses. A client is part of a client-server software architecture.

For example, a workstation requesting the contents of a file from a file server is a client of the file server.

client

(1) A desktop computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet, as well as any other electronic device that sends or receives data from a server. The term implies a connection to a wired or wireless network. Contrast with server. See client application, client download, client/server, thin client and fat client.

(2) One end of the spectrum in a request/supply relationship between programs. See X Window and OLE.

(3) The customer of a vendor or consultant. The client of an IT department is the end user.




References in classic literature ?
He acknowledged that he had acted under instructions received from a client. And then he put it to me, whether it would not be a breach of professional confidence on his part to say more.
Smalley, "between the risk of losing your client's business and the risk of losing Mine." Quite indefensible, I admit--an act of tyranny, and nothing less.
He smiled resignedly, and gave up the name of his client:
Vholes, sitting with his arms on the desk, quietly bringing the tips of his five right fingers to meet the tips of his five left fingers, and quietly separating them again, and fixedly and slowly looking at his client, replies, "A good deal is doing, sir.
"Sir," returns Vholes, always looking at the client as if he were making a lingering meal of him with his eyes as well as with his professional appetite.
Vholes," explains the client, somewhat abashed, "I had no intention to accuse you of insensibility."
Vholes, after glancing at the official cat who is patiently watching a mouse's hole, fixes his charmed gaze again on his young client and proceeds in his buttoned-up, half-audible voice as if there were an unclean spirit in him that will neither come out nor speak out, "What are you to do, sir, you inquire, during the vacation.
Vholes," returns the angry client. "You know as well as I that he would have strangled the suit if he could."
But the ashes of the father do not mingle with theirs; nor, from that night forward, did the attorney ever gain the remotest clue to the subsequent history of his queer client.' As the old man concluded his tale, he advanced to a peg in one corner, and taking down his hat and coat, put them on with great deliberation; and, without saying another word, walked slowly away.
If you think that it is in the best interests of your client that these letters should be placed in the hands of the Earl, then you would indeed be foolish to pay so large a sum of money to regain them..
And here I find you, a man of sense, boggling about terms, when your client's future and honour are at stake.
I must, therefore, abandon my client to her fate or I must play this last card.