rate of climb

(redirected from Climb rate)

rate of climb

[′rāt əv ′klīm]
(aerospace engineering)
Ascent of aircraft per unit time, usually expressed as feet per minute.

rate of climb

The rate of gain of vertical height per unit of time (i.e., feet/minute or meters/second). The rate of climb is normally calculated when an aircraft is climbing at its specified climbing speed and not in zoom climb. In helicopters, there are two rates of climb: the maximum rate of climb and the maximum vertical rate of climb. A vertical speed indicator (VSI) shows the rate of climb.
References in periodicals archive ?
You'll need roughly a 600-fpm climb rate to reach 6800 feet at ONZIQ, or you can continue climbing in the hold.
Our research also shows that the ruddy shelduck has a faster climb rate than the bar-headed goose.
They also showed that the ruddy shelduck has a faster climb rate than the bar-headed goose - the only waterfowl known to fly even higher.
Our research also shows that the ruddy shelduck has a faster climb rate than the barheaded goose - the only waterfowl known to fly even higher.
This is not likely to be much of a factor for most operators because they're buying the conversion for its rapid climb rate and improved short field performance, not long legs.
Periods of circling and gliding can be distinguished because they show different characteristic combinations of climb rate, ground speed, and flight direction variation (Fig.
According to Aibotix, its UAVs have a climb rate of up to 8 m/sec and a top speed of 60 km/h.
According to Aibotix, its UAVs have a climb rate of up to 8 m per second and a top speed of 60 km per hour.
After departure from Mesa the AW609 climbed to 20,000 feet, with an average climb rate of 1500 feet per minute, and cruised at 250 knots TAS enroute to Long Beach.
Climbing to 13,000 feet was uneventful at 100% power setting and an average climb rate of845 feet per minute.
On the subject of altitude, Airbus Military has been discussing engine setting changes with Pratt & Whitney since last year with a view to certifying a new climb rate profile to allow the aircraft to reach its ideal operational ceiling much faster with little or no detrimental effects on engine maintenance costs.