Clipper

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clipper,

type of sailing ship, designed for speed. Long and narrow, the clipper had the greatest beam aft of the center; the bow cleaved the waves; and the ship carried, besides topgallant and royal sails, skysails and moonrakers—a veritable cloud of sails. The type originated in the United States. Baltimore clippers and Atlantic packet ships were the forerunners of the true Yankee clipper, which may be said to have emerged with the Ann McKim, completed in Baltimore in 1833. The Yankee clipper was brought to perfection by Donald McKay of Boston, who built such vessels as the Flying Cloud, the Glory of the Seas, and the Lightning. U.S. and British clippers came to be known as China clippers because they utilized their speed to carry on a flourishing China trade in tea and opium. Clippers sailed from the U.S. Atlantic coast around Cape Horn to California in the days of the gold rush. They steadily reduced the time for their long voyages and held famous races. The clipper came into being only after its finally successful rival, the steamship, was engaging in transoceanic voyages. In the early days the clipper easily outran the plodding steam vessel, but, ironically, the improved steamship began to forge ahead even as some of the fastest and most beautiful clippers were being built. When the Cutty Sark, one of the swiftest and most celebrated British clippers, was completed at Dunbarton, Scotland, in 1869, the era of the commercial sailing ship had nearly come to an end.

Clipper

 

a two-electrode hydrogen-filled ionic device with an indirectly heated oxide cathode.

Clippers have the properties of high-current pulse-mode operated devices and rectifiers. They are used primarily to remove excessive voltages and to protect against unwanted signals, and they participate in charging the accumulators of radar-transmitter pulse modulators. They are also used as valves in current rectifiers.

The electrodes of the clipper are made of copper. The electrodes, together with ceramic walls, constitute the casing of the device. If a positive voltage is applied to the anode, a current pulse passes from the cathode to the anode, thereby removing any overvoltage. The advantages of the clipper include its low dynamic resistance (fractions of an ohm), its high electric strength, its low pick-up time (nanoseconds), its high stability under pulse-current overloads, and its greater protection effectiveness in comparison to other devices designed for similar purposes.

A. A. POLIAKOVA

clipper

[′klip·ər]
(electronics)

clipper

1. any fast sailing ship
2. Electronics another word for limiter

Clipper

(hardware, cryptography)
An integrated circuit which implements the SkipJack algorithm. The Clipper is manufactured by the US government to encrypt telephone data. It has the added feature that it can be decrypted by the US government, which has tried to make the chip compulsory in the United States. Phil Zimmerman (inventor of PGP) remarked, "This doesn't even pass the sniff test" (i.e. it stinks).

http://wired.com/clipper/.

news:alt.privacy.clipper

Clipper

(2)
A compiled dBASE dialect from Nantucket Corp, LA. Versions: Winter 85, Spring 86, Autumn 86, Summer 87, 4.5 (Japanese Kanji), 5.0. It uses the Xbase programming language.

Clipper

(1) See CA-Clipper and CLIPPER chip.

(2) A family of 32-bit RISC microprocessors from Intergraph that were used in earlier graphics workstations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Encouraged by the success of Greenpeace's sailing-assisted new Rainbow Warrior, 855 GT, launched in 2011, The Fair Transport Clipper Ship, 499 tons, is conceived as a working sailing-assisted Clipper Ship carrying cargo, crew, passengers and sailing trainees.
Just as the supersonic airliner Concorde was faster than a clipper ship, when either suffered a casualty, the insurance claims took time to properly investigate, evaluate, and resolve.
Despite the long connections of the Manila Galleons and the Clipper Ships, there were misconceptions then which still persist; the contradiction between a civilization which existed when Europeans were living in caves and technology that halted when gunpowder was discovered.
In 1991/1992, he introduced the sisters Star Flyer and Star Clipper to the cruise world--sleek 360-foot/179-passenger vessels that combine the nautical heritage of clipper ships with the creature comforts of cruise liners.
If it's a survey of eleven determined Massachusetts women which is needed, choose Lura Seavey's regional set of biographical sketches More Than Petticoats: Remarkable Massachusetts Women, outlining women who launched scientific and culinary revolutions in their fields, navigated clipper ships, and participated in war.
It was the last of many clipper ships designed, handcrafted and launched from there before World War I and steel ships brought the age of sailing to an end.
Teachers, for example, could develop a unit to study clipper ships. There are three lessons: (1) "Ships across Time: An Overview"; (2) "Merchant Ships and the Slave Trade"; and (3)"Navigating the Seas." Each lesson contains questions for discussion and extended activities.
Now it also has the award-winning Maritime Museum which celebrates the city's life-long association with the North Sea, from the days of clipper ships to the offshore oil industry.
With retail locations in some of the country's most exclusive vacation spots, Claire Murray offers a wide variety of hand-hooked rugs with seaside motifs, such as the coral reef pattern and the new nautical series featuring lighthouses, clipper ships, flags and compasses.
She had ceased firing but her colours were still flying." Janet says: "Roger's grand-father was a captain on clipper ships sailing to New Zealand.
For four years the Frolic and Faucon established an enviable record for speed, efficiency, and profitability in the opium trade until after 1849 when larger, more reliable, and faster steam-powered vessels drove the clipper ships out of the market.
For resource material we had photographs of the Tall Ships from "Operation Sail," library books on clipper ships, a three-dimensional model of the USS Constitution, and a seascape by Winslow Homer.