Clivia


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Clivia

 

a genus of plants of the family Amaryllidaceae. They are perennial evergreen plants with a short stem, small vertical rhizome, and thick fleshy roots. The leaves are leathery and lorate. The flowers, which have a simple six-membered orange, reddish orange, or yellowish pink corolla, are funnelform or tubular and gathered into umbels. The fruit is an orangish red berry. Three species are native to Southern Africa; they are cultivated as ornamentals. The species Clivia miniata has become a common indoor plant. Plants of the genus Clivia are propagated with rhizome offshoots and seeds.

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Clivia Nobili 2018 collection at Zamora In the face of ever increasing heritage losses in the Philippines, I set up the Pablo Antonio Ancestral Home Project whose aim was to promote the house with activities that would help with its upkeep.
Clivia Nobili's versatile clothes go for 50 to 300 euros (P3,188 to P19,132).
Murray, "Hybrid identification in Clivia (Amaryllidaceae) using chromosome banding and genomic in situ hybridization," Annals of Botany, vol.
There, in full bloom, were some 400 mature specimens of clivia.
D2 Ephe (MO) T 227 Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) D1 Erga T Matsumara & Nakai 228 Clivia miniata Regel D1 Erga G 229 Cnicus benedictus L.
(5) Greenhouse manager Rich Logee holds a clivia miniata plant.
Hints of visiting South Africa may have also been dropped and my investigations lead me to the kaffir lily (clivia).
55-75 Glory lily Gloriosa 60-66 Gloxinia Sinningia regina, 60-70 Sinningia speciosa, Sinningia hybrids Hoya Hoya carnosa, Hoya 50-54 bella Impatiens, touch-me- Impatiens balsamina 68 not, 'Busy Lizzie' Ivy geranium Pelargonium peltatum 60-75 Jasmine Jasminium 55-75 Kaffir lily Clivia miniata 55-60 Lollipop plant Pachystachys lutea 59 Miniature rose Rosa chinensis var.
When you look at some of the relatives of hippeastrum such as amaryllis, clivia, galanthus and narcissus, you begin to realise that they are all capable of giving us a tremendous show and we should perhaps grow more of this family in our gardens and houses.
When writing the first of this paper back on January 1, the temperature had risen to 48[degrees]F and I had moved my South African Clivia outside to help induce flowering.