Clodia


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Clodia

Clodia (klōˈdĕə), fl. 1st cent. B.C., Roman matron, famous among the ancient Romans for her beauty; sister of Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband, Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer (see Metellus, family), and she accused her lover, Marcus Caelius Rufus, of trying to murder her. According to tradition one of her many lovers was the poet Catullus; if this is true then it was she whom he immortalized as Lesbia.
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Perrini, Francesco y Vurro, Clodia (2006), "Social Entrepreneurship: Innovation and Social Change across Theory and Practice", en Mair, Johanna, Robinson, Jeffrey y Hockerts Kai (eds.), Social Entrepreneurship, Palgrave Macmillan, Londres.
No primeiro caso, Propercio inscreve Cintia como emulo de Sempronia (26), de Clodia (27), ou de Volumnia (28), ja que essas dominam a arte da musica, das letras e da danca, alem de serem paradigmaticas da vida cortesa (29).
Cicero holds her up as a model of Republican virtue in order to shame her contemporary kinswoman, Clodia: nonne te, si nostrae imagines viriles non commovebant, ne progenies quidem mea, Q.
My Carmen, see, makes your Clodia seem blowsy, a diluted wine, a dull receptacle for perfumed, sheet-wrapped goatherds.
Romanian Social Dialogue Minister Aurelia, Bucharest Governor Paul Nicolae Petrovani Former Prime Minister and candidate for presidency Mihai Razvan Angureanux, EU deputy Clodia Tapardel and Bosnia Herzegovinian Ambassador to Bucharest Dusko Kovacevic attended at the event.
School youth will always favor Catullus and his passionate affair with Clodia (Lesbia) and the violent emotional changes from hating to loving, but one grows up and Horace is the antidote, as the author discovered.