Clodia

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Clodia

Clodia (klōˈdĕə), fl. 1st cent. B.C., Roman matron, famous among the ancient Romans for her beauty; sister of Publius Clodius. She was suspected of murdering her husband, Quintus Caecilius Metellus Celer (see Metellus, family), and she accused her lover, Marcus Caelius Rufus, of trying to murder her. According to tradition one of her many lovers was the poet Catullus; if this is true then it was she whom he immortalized as Lesbia.
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Skinner, Clodia Metelli: The Tribune's Sister (Oxford University Press, 2010).
He frequently accuses her of being unfaithful to him, which is in itself ironic because, if Lesbia was realty the Roman noblewoman Clodia Metelli - and there seems to be little doubt; that she was - she already had a husband.
Volume 33 in the Oklahoma Series in Classical Culture, this title provides primary sources on Clodia Metelli, the Roman woman who influenced Cicero, Catullus, and countless others.
It centres on the relationship between the poet Catullus and his older married lover, Clodia Metelli who, drawn from the highest echelons of society, has vast wealth and influence.
Aria (Polly Walker) is just a name in the history books, so the writers have shrewdly transformed her from a low-profile Roman matron into a high-profile bombshell resembling Clodia Metelli, the patrician party animal whose numerous lovers included the poet Catullus.
Cicero refuted Clodia Metelli's charges of assault against Caelius Rufus by saying, in effect, "If you were a virtuous woman, you wouldn't be in this courtroom, bringing these charges; and if you are not a virtuous woman, we need not believe them."
Catullus, after all, identifies Fulvia's one-time husband Clodius as the brother of his inamorata Clodia Metelli, to whom he refers by the metrically equivalent pseudonym Lesbia, at 79.1, with Lesbius est pulcher.
Perhaps most importantly for a narrative history, Holland has a full (and often ironic) appreciation for the innate drama of his material, both substantive and anecdotal--offering, for example, an account of the sexual intrigue of the Bona Dea scandal worthy of any supermarket tabloid, as well as brilliant character portraits of major and minor figures in Roman politics, from Crassus to Pompey's father to Clodia Metelli, "the embodiment of [the] exclusive, if faintly sleazy, allure ...