Clonmacnoise


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Clonmacnoise

(klŏnmăknoiz`), village, Co. Offaly, central Republic of Ireland, on the Shannon River. The monastery founded (548) on the site by St. Kieran became the most famous in Ireland. It survived 1,000 years of raids and invasions, until it was destroyed by the English in 1552. Notable ruins include a cathedral (built 904), several churches, two round towers, three sculptured crosses, over 200 inscribed stones, and a castle (built 1214). The ruins comprise a national monument. The annual feast of St. Kieran is held at Clonmacnoise.
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More than 2.5 million people flocked to see Pope John Paul II as he visited Dublin, Drogheda, Clonmacnoise, Galway, Knock, Limerick and Maynooth.
Notre Dame, or indeed the Vikings at Clonmacnoise in Ireland.
Sites weill visit: Dingle Peninsula, Aran Islands, Clonmacnoise, Kilfenora, the Burren, and more.
Tour highlights u A Strokestown Park House and Famine Museum visit u Explore lively, historic Dublin u Irish National Stud and Japanese Gardens u Discover Carrick-on-Shannon and Athlone u Ancient Clonmacnoise tour u A Belvedere House and Gardens tour u Cruise on the River Shannon u Entrance to the Derryglad Folk Museum u Fully escorted by a friendly, experienced tour manager u Five nights' four-star half-board hotel accommodation, return flights and transfers
Nine papers from that gathering consider such topics as the palaeography of H in Lebor na hUidre, three texts from Lebor na hUidre and their testimony, eschatological themes in Lebor na hUidre, Lebor na hUidre from Clonmacnoise to Kilbarron, and Lebor na hUidre's later history including its Connacht sojourn 1359-1470.
For instance, Ulin claims that "several annals record the deaths of Diarmuid and Dervorgilla in ways that shape subsequent literary and historical imaginings of them as eternally linked by their mutual guilt," but she goes on to document that manuscript sources like The Annals of Loch Ce and The Annals of Clonmacnoise actually say very little about Dervorgilla's death (28-29).
We spent our time pottering around the countryside and visiting the ancient monastic site of Clonmacnoise with the River Shannon providing a picturesque backdrop.
Highlights of the tour included: Blarney Castle and Park, The Ring of Kerry, Cliffs of Moher, Beara Pennisula, Aran Islands and Clonmacnoise Monastery.
(14) The lordship granted to him extended to almost 325,000 hectares (over 800,000 acres) and stretched from Clonmacnoise on the River Shannon, eastwards to the Irish Sea.