closed shop

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closed shop

[¦klōzd ′shäp]
(computer science)
A data-processing center so organized that only professional programmers and operators have access to the center to meet the needs of users.
(industrial engineering)
An establishment permitting only union members to be employed.

Closed Shop

 

in capitalist countries the demand presented by a trade union to an entrepreneur that the latter hire only members of that particular union. In making these demands, the union often assumes the obligation of supplying the entrepreneur with the labor force needed. Under preferential hiring, which is a variety of the closed shop, the entrepreneur pledges to give preference to members of this union in hiring workers. The demand for the closed shop is resisted by entrepreneurs, whose interest is in weakening the trade unions. In the USA the closed shop is prohibited by the federal Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 as well as by the laws of several states. The closed shop is also prohibited in several provinces of Canada, in Australia, and elsewhere.

closed shop

A construction project operating under a work system that requires membership in a particular union as a necessary condition of employment.

closed shop

An environment in which only data processing staff is allowed access to the computer. Contrast with open shop.
References in periodicals archive ?
West Coast Shipbuilders Limited, which operated on False Creek lands inside Vancouver, adopted a confrontational approach to labour and stubbornly resisted any closed shop for certain unions.
Organized labour waited, and waited some more, for positive policy from the Canadian government and its department officials on matters of collective bargaining and enforcement of the closed shop.
(33) The closed shop formed part of the master agreement in the US.
Under zone-wide wage stability, companies and unions negotiated closed shop clauses.
The closed shop easily allowed wartime shipbuilders to control workers and limit extended negotiation with numerous parties, as long as unions remained agreeable and compilant.
Several Vancouver-area firms shared Kaiser's views and early on adopted the closed shop in collective agreements with the unions.
With respect to union structure, unions are seen to exert a negative influence on financial performance only where the closed shop (or a pseudo-closed shop supported by management - see below) is still in place.
collective bargaining coverage; membership density; incidence of the closed shop) there was a sharp fall in unionization over the 1980s.
The 1980 Employment Act placed additional restrictions on picketing, made unions liable to be sued for damages, enlarged the grounds on which to claim unfair dismissal for refusal to join a closed shop, and repealed the statutory recognition procedure.
effectively undermined the pre-entry closed shop), made all secondary action unlawful, and made selective dismissal of strikers taking unofficial action possible.
For example, researchers have in the past considered heterogeneity in estimated union effects on economic outcomes, and one specific issue that has been considered is whether one is able to identify a closed shop effect over and above any basic union effect (e.g.
Column 1 simply includes a dummy variable indicating whether or not manual union(s) are recognized for collective bargaining purposes, whilst column 2 additionally includes a dummy variable indicating whether closed shop arrangements for manuals are present or whether management recommends that manual workers join a union.(8) This latter variable is included as it seems likely that it indicates situations of greater union strength.