C. difficile

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Related to Clostridium difficile: Clostridium difficile colitis

C. difficile

or

C. diff:

see ClostridiumClostridium,
genus of gram-positive bacteria (see Gram's stain), several species of which cause significant, potentially deadly diseases in humans as a result of the toxins that each produces.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment failures.
Biological activities of toxins A and B of Clostridium difficile. Infect Immun.
In this study we found that 8 cases from 25 cases were admitted to renal unit were renal failure in dialysis and 2 cases from these 8 cases were showed positive growth on Clostridium difficile and we found that, 50% of renal failure on dialysis cases including two cases of the previous showed positive test for toxin A\B and 50% of cases show negative test for toxin A\B and this was in agreement with a study which indicated that, the dialysis process might be at high risk for the development of C.
Clostridium difficile in retail meat products, USA, 2007.
Asymptomatic carriers are a potential source for transmission of epidemic and nonepidemic Clostridium difficile strains among long-term care facility residents.
Almost 500,000 cases of Clostridium difficile infection were reported in the United States in 2011 with 29,000 deaths.
Wilcox, "Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection," Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy, vol.
Cantu et al., "Hospital-onset clostridium difficile infection rates in persons with cancer or Hematopoietic stem cell transplant: A C3IC network report," Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol.
Poor absorption of oral vancomycin as predicted by pharmacokinetics forms the basis for use of oral vancomycin for colitis due to Clostridium difficile [5].
Clostridium difficile infections, known as CDI, occur most often in patients following the prolonged use antibiotics because such use can kill the human bodys natural gastrointestinal flora and allow overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria.
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