Clovis culture

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Clovis culture,

a group of Paleo-Indians (see Americas, antiquity and prehistory of theAmericas, antiquity and prehistory of the,
study of the origins of the aboriginal peoples of the Americas. Archaeologists believe humans had entered and occupied much of the Americas by the end of the Pleistocene epoch, but the date of their original entry into the Americas is
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) known through artifacts first excavated in the early 1930s near Clovis, N.Mex. The artifacts, including chipped flint points known as Clovis points and a variety of additional stone tools, were found along with remains of large mammals, particularly extinct mammoths. The remains, which date from 10,000 to 9000 B.C., were found widely in North America, especially on the Great Plains. Like Folsom points (see Folsom cultureFolsom culture
, a group of Paleo-Indians (see Americas, antiquity and prehistory of the) known through artifacts first excavated (1926) near Folsom, E of Raton, N.Mex. The artifacts, including chipped flint points known as Folsom points and a variety of other stone tools, were
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), Clovis points show a distinct lengthwise groove (known as fluting) on each face that served to enhance the hafting to spear shafts. Clovis groups are among the earliest definitively dated human populations in the Americas, but there is stone-tool and other evidence of earlier humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
These artifacts differ substantially from long spearpoints used by Clovis people.
Using this knowledge, archaeologists should be able to track Clovis people both across the landscape and through time.
In the past, researchers have argued that the Clovis people were the oldest human inhabitants of the Americas.
Erlandson said the artifacts argue against the notion that the Ice Age Clovis people followed an open corridor through central Canada and into America and then gradually migrated down river valleys to the coast and eventually learned to fish.
As North America emerged from the depths of the most recent Ice Age, average annual temperatures rose steadily and the great ice sheets retreated, opening up a corridor through western Canada that allowed the Clovis people access to the continent.
Roosevelt, of the Field Museum in Chicago and the University of Illinois, reported radiocarbon dates of material in the Brazilian cave which indicated that early paleo-Indians there were contemporaries of the Clovis people with a distinctive foraging economy and different styles of stone weapons.
For decades, archaeologists thought that the Clovis people were the first to enter the Americas, 13,000 years ago.
Prior to the research, it was widely believed the Clovis people were the first inhabitants of North America around 12,000 to 13,000 years ago.
The evidence, found by current UO archaeologist Dennis Jenkins and his students, offers the first hard evidence that humans found their way into the New World before the emergence of what is known as the Clovis people about 13,000 years ago.
The 18-month-old's bones are the only human remains ever found of ancient Native Americans known as the Clovis people.
Evidence that a non-Clovis culture was present in North America at least as early as Clovis people themselves and likely before is presented by an international team of researchers from the USA, the UK, and Denmark.
Ancient North America's Clovis people, known as mammoth and mastodon hunters of the Great Plains, may have started out as gomphothere hunters of northwestern Mexico.