Cluniac


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Related to Cluniac: Cistercian Order

Cluniac

of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
References in periodicals archive ?
Identifiable by their black robes, the Cluniacs emphasised elaborate ritual, rich vestments and precious drinking goblets in their devotions.
In truth Trappist practices were more austere than those of Benedict and Bernard of Clairvaux, who was a Cistercian, a doctor of the Church, the author of a great body of sermons, letters and treatises, and a strong influential voice opposing the laxity of the Cluniacs.
There are two locations of historical significance in the Much Wenlock area - Wenlock Priory, the beautiful remains of the large Cluniac Priory, and Shipton Hall, an Elizabethan manor house built in the 14th century by Richard Lutwyche, located in the Corvedale Valley.
Hassig, "He Will Make Alive Your Mortal Bodies: Cluniac Spirituality and the Tomb of Alfonso Ansurez", Gesta, XXX/2 (1991), pp.
Es mas, Colin Smith, sostiene que "among the Cluniac monks in all countries, some awareness of the especial relationship of their order with the Leonese royal house and of Cluniac monastic communities in northern Spain, several being on the pilgrim roads, can be assumed.
It enters history in the early 8th century when Sigward, a follower of King Ethelbald of Mercia, sold his estate there to the future St Milburga, abbess of Cluniac Priory at Wenlock.
The park, just outside the town centre, was once part of the town's vast Norman Castle estate and houses the remains of the 12th century Cluniac Priory of St James and Priory Hall - once home to the Earls of Dudley.
Paisley Abbey was founded as a Cluniac priory in 1163, and became an abbey in 1245.
Armi no parece molestarle mantener el titulo de Cluniac Art para denominar la obra de los maestros escultores a los que atribuye los programas esenciales del corpus que nos ocupa.
During his peaceful reign the monastic reforms undertaken by Cluniac monks in France reached England, through the leadership of Dunstan (909-988), AEthelwold of Winchester (909-984) and Oswald of Worcester (died 992).
He also discusses the usually polemical motivations of patrons, such as Ketton's, the Cluniac Peter the Venerable.
By the early 11th century, the abbey was the hub of a huge Cluniac federation of monasteries that were all ultimately under the authority of the abbot of Cluny.