Cluniac

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Related to Cluniacs: Cistercians

Cluniac

of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
References in periodicals archive ?
If you have a wish to try sign language for yourself, the Cluniac sign lexicon has been thoughtfully provided by the author, which on bad days could help you to disappear for a while into silence while your headache gets better.
58) About a century after the Cluniac reform was instituted at Saint-Martial, the abbots of the monastery, although still officially Cluniacs, encouraged a return to the community's Aquitanian traditions in liturgy and music, including liturgical drama, polyphony, and tropes.
r]); Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, 369, a thirteenth-century notated missal-breviary from the Cluniac monastery of Lewes (fol.
But, fortunately for art-lovers, it was the Cluniac promoters of art who held sway during the Romanesque era.
Gerald of Wales, in his Speculum Ecclesie, recalls meeting Sero when he was a Cluniac, saying that he soon became dissatisfied with that style of monastic life and so joined the stricter Cistercians.
Some days after Gerald's arrival, he and Serlo rode off together towards Evesham, and Gerald asked Serlo if his emaciated appearance was due to Cistercian austerity; he recalled that in his youth he had met Serlo with Gerald's teacher, Haimo, and that at the time Serlo, then a Cluniac monk, was sleek and fat (`carnosae quidem amplitudinis et corpulent) valde status').
Cluniac monk (after which he met Haimo and Gerald somewhere) and went to
Charite-sur-Loire, then became disillusioned with Cluniac laxness and joined
The meeting between Serlo and Haimo, in Gerald's presence, must have been in early 1165 at the latest, and Serlo was already a Cluniac by this time, as Gerald tells us.
In this sense Bernard obviously did consider the Cluniacs in general terms as representatives of |excess' in the monastic life.