Cluniac

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Related to Cluniacs: Cistercians

Cluniac

of or relating to a reformed Benedictine order founded at the French town of Cluny in 910
References in periodicals archive ?
The pilgrim monks who supervised the building of Paisley Abbey soon after the Knights Templar discovery of the sacred scrolls belonged to the Cluniac Order.
If you have a wish to try sign language for yourself, the Cluniac sign lexicon has been thoughtfully provided by the author, which on bad days could help you to disappear for a while into silence while your headache gets better.
(58) About a century after the Cluniac reform was instituted at Saint-Martial, the abbots of the monastery, although still officially Cluniacs, encouraged a return to the community's Aquitanian traditions in liturgy and music, including liturgical drama, polyphony, and tropes.
[146.sup.r]); Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum, 369, a thirteenth-century notated missal-breviary from the Cluniac monastery of Lewes (fol.
But, fortunately for art-lovers, it was the Cluniac promoters of art who held sway during the Romanesque era.
To start with, there was the extraordinary advance of monasticism, which sparked a power feud between the established orders such as the aristocratic Benedictines and modern hybrids of that discipline such as the Cluniacs, or more radical and later still, the Franciscans and Dominicans, who supported mendicant evangelism--questioning concepts of ecclesiastical land holdings, endowments, inheritance and public service.(14)
Such conflicts of opinion as those between Cistercians and Cluniacs, and between monks and canons, are skilfully analyzed.
The texts of the founding Fathers of Latin monasticism were to provide the Cluniacs and their friends with a secure zone of moral purity.
In 1098, fifty years after the establishing of the Carthusian Charterhouse, the Benedictines in response to extreme Carthusian asceticism on one hand and in reaction against the pomp and worldliness of the Cluniac Order on the other--the Cluniacs being a group that had set themselves apart from traditional Benedictine practice with an autocratic organization centered in the Abbey of Cluny--founded the order of Cistercians in an effort to reinstate the life of the first Benedictines at Monte Cassino.
This was likely the thinking behind the 1275 injunction to the Cluniacs in England prohibiting them from eating meat in the presence of seculars in the monastery or indulging in fleshy feasts in the houses of laity.
Cowdrey, The Cluniacs and the Gregorian Reform (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970); and John van Engen, "The `Crisis of Cenobitism' Reconsidered: Benedictine Monasticism in the Years 1050-1150," Speculum 61 (1986): 269-304.