Cluny


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Cluny: Cluny lace, Cluny Museum, Cluny Abbey

Cluny

(klo͞o`nē, Fr. klünē`), former abbey, E France, in the present Saône-et-Loire dept., founded (910) by St. Berno, a Burgundian monk and reformer. Cluny was one of the chief religious and cultural centers of Europe. The third abbey church built on the site, Cluny III (11th cent.), was designed in the mature Romanesque style. As reconstructed by Kenneth J. Conant, Cluny III was a five-aisle basilica with double transepts and five radiating chapels around the apse. Towers marked the major and minor crossings of the nave, the major transept arms, and the western facade. When completed in the 12th cent., Cluny III was the largest church in the world. The abbey was mostly destroyed during the French Revolution.

Cluny

 

a city in Burgundy, the department of Saône-et-Loire, France. It is situated in the picturesque valley of the Grosne River (a tributary of the Saône), west of Mâcon. Population, 44,000 (1962). It is the site of wood-products industries, primarily furniture manufacturing. The city is known for its Benedictine monastery (abbey) with Romanesque churches. These structures, which had a significant influence on the development of Romanesque architecture in Europe, include the Cluny II church (955–81) and the adjacent grandiose Cluny III church (from 1088 to the 12th century). The Cluny III church was a five-naved basilica with two transepts, a ring of chapels, and several towers. Both churches were destroyed in the 19th century. All that remains is the southern arm of the main transept (with an attached tower) of the Cluny III church. Still extant in Cluny are the Gothic churches of St. Marcel (begun in 1159) and Nôtre-Dame (13th century), the town hall (early 16th century), a hospital (17th century), and Romanesque and Gothic residential buildings.

REFERENCE

Virey, J. L’Abbaye de Cluny, 4th ed. Paris, 1957.

Cluny

a town in E central France: reformed Benedictine order founded here in 910; important religious and cultural centre in the Middle Ages. Pop.: 4376 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
In relation to the two victims at the Cluny, there was no injuries to speak of," he said.
With Marcel Cluny, we have found the ideal sales channel," said Luca Pozzuoli, who is in charge of emerging markets as well as vice president of market development at PartyLite.
It was totally rammed in Cluny 2 for Sam Fender, the crowd seemed spell bound by his vocals.
The payoff eventually arrives as Fever and Cluny begin to uncover the forgotten secrets of humanity's downfall and rebirth as an "improved" species.
Ms Gilks was on patrol when she saw Cluny fighting with another male outside the Tokyo nightclub on Queen Street.
We are giving one lucky reader the chance to win a two-night stay for two at the beautiful Cluny Bank Hotel, Forres.
Entre las esculturas del corpus, todos los autores coinciden en que los capiteles de la girola de Cluny III, sea cual sea el lugar que se les atribuya en la historia del arte (su datacion ha fluctuado bastante (3)), son la creacion primera y mayor (4).
Epicurean sage and modern Montaigne, Claude Michel Cluny has published to date close to five thousand pages of short stories, novels, poems, historical studies, and autobiographical works, while thousands of pages of journalistic essays and reviews are still awaiting their publication in book format.
His study Of the monastic vow of silence is paired with the study of the system of hand signs which evolved at the great Burgundian monastery of Cluny and spread to associated houses.
Naturally, some are better than others and one of the best autumnal displays by far is at Cluny Gardens, near Aberfeldy, Perthshire.
Antonio Cluny, the president of the Portugal's public prosecutors' service, said: "Without the little girl's body, everything is extremely complicated.
Pope Urban II (1042-99), once a monk there, wrote of Cluny that it "shines as another sun over the earth.