Clytemnestra


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Related to Clytemnestra: Aegisthus, Iphigenia

Clytemnestra

(klī'təmnĕs`trə), in Greek mythology, the daughter of Leda and Tyndareus. Homer described her as the noble-minded wife of Agamemnon, persuaded to infidelity by the tyrant Aegisthus. However, the Greek tragedians, most specifically Aeschylus, depicted her as remorseless and vengeful. She was the mother by Agamemnon of Orestes, Electra, and Iphigenia. She conspired with Aegisthus to murder Agamemnon on his return from the Trojan War, giving various justifications, most notably the sacrifice of Iphigenia by Agamemnon at the onset of the war. Orestes, who had been living in exile, returned and revenged the death of his father by killing his mother and Aegisthus.

Clytemnestra

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of the king of Sparta, Tyndareus, and the sister of Helen of Troy. She was given in marriage to Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos), who led the Greek forces in the Trojan campaign. During Agamemnon’s absence, Clytemnestra committed adultery with his cousin Aegisthus. She murdered her husband upon his return. Clytemnestra and Aegisthus were in turn slain by Clytemnestra’s own son, Orestes, to avenge his father’s death. The fate of Clytemnestra is the subject of tragedies by Aeschylus (the trilogy Oresteia), Sophocles (Electra), and Euripides (Electra).

Clytemnestra

takes Aegisthus as paramour. [Gk. Lit.: Orestes]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mitros' family pays for its scion's nerve in resisting Agamemnon and Clytemnestra: the family is murdered and the "house reduced to rubble" (173)--a disproportionate retribution that sounds like the fate of Palestinians who fly kites and draw Israeli air strikes.
conjugal fidelity ([phrase omitted]; see 606-7, where Clytemnestra
One had the idea to switch the ending of the play from Clytemnestra restoring justice and order to Greek society to her essentially telling the other characters that it's on them to fix it themselves.
The other female character is, of course, Clytemnestra who, while unrepentant for the killing of her husband, is herself a strong woman as the antagonist to Elektra, likewise bending gender stereotypes in her "masculine" exercise of power and authority.
The second play shows the fallout for Electra and Orestes, Clytemnestra's two surviving children.
In the final scene of Euripides's Electra, the violence precipitated by Apollo's injunction comes in for strongly accusatory language from Castor, Clytemnestra's sibling and one of the dei ex machina (Pollux is present but silent) that draw the drama to a close.
The words are doubly ironic in the ears of listeners who knew he would return to be murdered by Clytemnestra in Aeschylus's Oresteia.
Coincidentally, Beltran won third place in the 2009 Clytemnestra ReMash Challenge organized by the Martha Graham Dance Company.
Although Gluck never intended the operas to be performed in sequence, the idea of doing so is defensible since the stories are related (based on tragedies by Euripides, both deal with painful and cruel sacrifice) and feature the same title character from Greek mythology--daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, sister of Orestes and Elektra.
Hugo von Hofinannsthal's text is a tale of revenge, a retelling of the ancient Orestes legend that focuses on Orestes' sister Electra and the twisted and ultimately fatal family romance that arises out of the murder of their father King Agamemnon by their mother Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus.
AS AN actor, Matthew Bulgo has carved out a successful career on the stage in classics such as Under Milk Wood and A Christmas Carol as well as contemporary pieces like Gwyneth Lewis' Clytemnestra.
If doubling shapes the relationship that unfolds between Alma and Elisabet in Persona, there is also a duality within Elisabet that matches her simultaneous relationship to the two key female figures of the plays entitled Electra: Electra herself and Clytemnestra. In order to determine the nature of that relationship, however, one must ask first whether one or the other of the leading extant versions of Electra is more relevant: that of Sophocles or Euripides?