Clytemnestra


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Related to Clytemnestra: Aegisthus, Iphigenia

Clytemnestra

(klī'təmnĕs`trə), in Greek mythology, the daughter of Leda and Tyndareus. Homer described her as the noble-minded wife of Agamemnon, persuaded to infidelity by the tyrant Aegisthus. However, the Greek tragedians, most specifically Aeschylus, depicted her as remorseless and vengeful. She was the mother by Agamemnon of Orestes, Electra, and Iphigenia. She conspired with Aegisthus to murder Agamemnon on his return from the Trojan War, giving various justifications, most notably the sacrifice of Iphigenia by Agamemnon at the onset of the war. Orestes, who had been living in exile, returned and revenged the death of his father by killing his mother and Aegisthus.

Clytemnestra

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the daughter of the king of Sparta, Tyndareus, and the sister of Helen of Troy. She was given in marriage to Agamemnon, the king of Mycenae (or Argos), who led the Greek forces in the Trojan campaign. During Agamemnon’s absence, Clytemnestra committed adultery with his cousin Aegisthus. She murdered her husband upon his return. Clytemnestra and Aegisthus were in turn slain by Clytemnestra’s own son, Orestes, to avenge his father’s death. The fate of Clytemnestra is the subject of tragedies by Aeschylus (the trilogy Oresteia), Sophocles (Electra), and Euripides (Electra).

Clytemnestra

takes Aegisthus as paramour. [Gk. Lit.: Orestes]
References in periodicals archive ?
As Clytemnestra ushers her husband to his last bath, the Chorus sings its last complete stasimon, an enigmatic song that reveals its utter confusion.
However, a few pages after Electra's comment to Clytemnestra, one may be startled to read the following one by Clytemnestra herself: "There is a strange power in motherhood; a mother may be wronged but she never learns to hate her child.
The two soloists are excellent: Felicity Palmer, mezzo soprano, sings a torrid Clytemnestra excerpt from Strauss's Elektra, while Gidon Kremer gives a fine reading of an excerpt from Berg's Violin Concerto.
style: In ``Electricidad,'' Alfaro updates and transfers the story of Electra and Orestes' revenge on their mother, Clytemnestra, to present-day Los Angeles, where Electricidad and Orestes look to avenge the slaying of their gang-leader father.
She wrote scathing indictments, often laced with hilarity, of academic icons like John Crowe Ransom and of artistic ones like Martha Graham, whose impersonations, in dance, of Clytemnestra and Emily Dickinson (the latter holding one toe toward heaven) the poet notes with sharply described and derisory delight.
Purists may whinge that they've also tweaked a few of the incidents and characters to suit the Hollywood version -the hammer wielding Ajax (Tyler Mane) is an early casualty to Hector whereas in the book he's still around to help mop up after the sacking, and Agamemnon's comeuppance is no longer left to jealous wife Clytemnestra -but then this is no more aimed at classic scholars than Gladiator was.
Greek legend has it that his wife Clytemnestra, jealous of the slave-girl lover Cassandra that her husband brought back from Troy, murdered them both on his return.
Behind the She-Wolf hovers the shadow of the classical-romantic figure of the Fatal Woman: Clytemnestra, Vittoria Corombona, La Belle Dame Sans Merci.
The figure in Leonardo's Leda exists independently of the depicted subsidiary figures--the seducer Jove in the form of the swan, and the two sets of twins, Castor and Pollux and Helen and Clytemnestra, who came from their union--which help to identify her.
This prejudice later reversed itself into a claim that English actresses were incapable of the sensuality of the role, expressed most pithily by Kenneth Tynan (about Peggy Ashcroft in 1953): `The great sluts of world drama, from Clytemnestra to Anna Christie, have always puzzled our girls; and an English Cleopatra is a contradiction in terms'.
Seneca Medea 969--970; Apuleius Apology 78, where Medea is joined with Philomela and Clytemnestra as murderesses who use swords), or its use by one of the witches may be an instance of imperfect suturing by Apuleius of two disparate stories, and it provides thematic links within the Golden Ass to the sword-swallower described earlier by Lucius and to the "flashing sword" later used by Charite (8.