Cnidus

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Related to Cnidos: Praxiteles, Knidos

Cnidus

or

Cnidos

(both: nī`dəs), ancient Greek city of Caria, SW Asia Minor, on Cape Krio, in present SW Asian Turkey. It was partly on the peninsula and partly on an island that had been created by cutting through the peninsula. One of the cities of the Dorian Hexapolis, it sought to maintain its independence but fell (540 B.C.) under Persian rule. It had a large trade, particularly in wine, and was also noted for its medical school and other institutions of learning. One of the most famous statues of the ancient world, Aphrodite by Praxiteles, was there. In the waters off Cnidus the Athenians under Conon defeated the Spartans under Pisander in 394 B.C. Cnidus retained its importance in Roman times and is mentioned in the Bible (Acts 27.7; 1 Mac. 15.23).
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References in periodicals archive ?
because it describes Cnidos as prosperous and the Lydian coast as depressed and fails to mention the earthquakes that damaged Cnidos in Lucian's time.
They employed Greek doctors and medical writers, and extended hospitality to such renowned intellectuals as Eudoxos of Cnidos, the astronomer and mathematician (Hornblower, 336-337).
possibly at Cnidos if one could still find there the divinely naked Aphrodite of Praxiteles, - but otherwise one must look for force to the Goddesses of Indian Mythology.
AD 190), one of the chief sources outlining the beliefs of the Sceptics, the author refers to the travel writings of a cynic philosopher, Eudoxus of Cnidos (fl.
we oppose habit to the other things, as for instance to law when we say that amongst the Persians it is the habit to indulge in intercourse with males, but amongst the Romans it is forbidden by law to do so; and that, whereas with us adultery is forbidden, amongst the Massagetae it is traditionally regarded as an indifferent custom, as Eudoxus of Cnidos relates in the first book of his Travels; and that, whereas intercourse with a mother is forbidden in our country, in Persia it is the general custom to form such marriages; and also among the Egyptians men marry their sisters, a thing forbidden by law amongst us.
Moreover, Sextus Empiricus and Eudoxus of Cnidos' relativism would, according to Spenser's Irenius, be undermined by the experience of Ireland.
One is reminded of the Aphrodite of Cnidos in Pseudo-Lucian's Amores, a text perhaps written not much after Pausanias in the late second or third century A.D.
by Agatharchides, a native of Cnidos in southwestern Anatolia, who was resident in Ptolemaic Egypt as secretary to a prominent official of the court.
Artemidorus of Cnidos, a teacher of rhetoric who tries to warn Caesar to beware of the conspirators led by Brutus and Cassius.
If we read this image through the lens of stories in later antiquity of those who fell in love with statues (e.g., the Aphrodite of Cnidos (50)), it may seem a highly distasteful notion, evoking not so much the artistic creativity of Ovid's Pygmalion as the functionality of a life-size rubber doll.