coagulase

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coagulase

[kō′ag·yə‚lās]
(biochemistry)
Any enzyme that causes coagulation of blood plasma.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical and molecular epidemiologic characteristics of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bloodstream infections in intensive care neonates.
Elson, "Deep infection of cemented total hip arthroplasties caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery--Series B, vol.
In conclusion, computer terminals at the University of Regina and high schools within the Regina area were found to be contaminated with various staphylococci species, including normal flora, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, and potentially pathogenic MRSA.
While it is possible that the decedent did have such an infection, its presence can only be inferred from facts that are equally consistent with the Candida and coagulase-negative staph infections.
influenzae was isolated more frequently from the paediatric group (p<0.05) and coagulase-negative staphylococci mainly from adults (p<0.05).
The direct microbiological examination of former infected patch revealed coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Propionobacterium species in our case.
Of these 15 patients, coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 10 patients, Escherichia coli in two patients, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aerobacter spp, and Staphylococcus aureus in the other three patients.
Coagulase-negative staphylococcus is the seventh most common cause of blood-stream infections in Welsh hospitals, with a rate of nine cases per 100,000 bed days.
aureus; Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci; and staphylococci of animals.
Infecting pathogen types--identified in at least 10 patients at baseline--included coagulase-negative and coagulase-positive staphylococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, [beta]-hemolytic streptococci, and enterobacteriaceae.