coarctation

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Related to Coarctation of the aorta: tetralogy of Fallot, patent ductus arteriosus

coarctation

[‚kō·ärk′tā·shən]
(medicine)
A compression of the wall of a vessel, narrowing the lumen and reducing the volume (or flow).
A stricture or occlusion resulting from an outside force deforming a vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congenital heart surgery nomenclature and database project: Patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch.
Repair of coarctation of the aorta in adults: the fate of systolic hypertension.
Moore, "Stent implantation for coarctation of the aorta in children <30kg," JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, vol.
Coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing of part of the aorta (the major artery leading out of the heart).
Acquired thromboatheromatous coarctation of the aorta: acquired coarctation of the aorta.
Recurrent arch obstruction after isolated coarctation of the aorta in neonates and young infants is low weight a risk factor J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg.
The study also documented coarctation of the aorta at the level of a PDA, neither of which had been shown on echocardiography (Fig.
Any infant with a facial hemangioma measuring 5 cm or more in diameter probably deserves cardiac echocardiography to look for transverse coarctation of the aorta, MRI and magnetic resonance angiography to look for arterial anomalies, and an eye exam to look for structural eye abnormalities even if there is no periocular hemangioma, she advised.
Authors Abuhamad (obstetrics and gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School) and Chaoui (obstetrics and gynecology, Prenatal Diagnosis and Human Genetics Center, Germany), cover a wide range of topics, including: congenital heart defects and their genetic aspects, color Doppler in fetal echocardiography, coarctation of the aorta and interrupted aortic arch, complete and congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, fetal cardopmyopathies and fetal heart tumors, and more.
In children, stents are used to mechanically enlarge anatomic structures for conditions such as peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, the heart defect coarctation of the aorta, and atrial septal defects created by interventional techniques to provide oxygenated blood.
Exposure to sulfonamides was associated with the most defects, including anencephaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, coarctation of the aorta, choanal atresia, and transverse limb deficiency.
When the researchers analyzed data for adults separately, they saw declines in death rates from several congenital anomalies, including ventricular septal defect (60%), patent ductus arteriosus (87%), coarctation of the aorta (75%), and Ebstein's anomaly (55%).