Coarse-Wool Sheep Raising

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Coarse-Wool Sheep Raising

 

a branch of animal husbandry involved in breeding sheep with heterogeneous coarse wool. Coarse-wool sheep raising is economically profitable only when breeds of sheep are raised that produce meat, fat, milk, lambs, and sheepskin, in addition to wool. The basic types of coarse-wool sheep produced in the USSR include meat and wool sheep—for example, the Kuchugur, Mikhnovo. and Circassian breeds, and meat and fat types, such as the Gissar and Edil’baev fat-tailed breeds. In addition, there are meat, wool, and milk types—the Tushino, Balbas, Karabakh, Karachaevian, Dagestan, and other Transcaucasian and northern Caucasian breeds. Lambing varieties such as the Karakul, Sokol, and Reshetilovka breeds are raised, as well as sheepskin types, including the Romanov, Kulunda. and northern short-tailed breeds. In some northern European countries (Sweden, Norway. Denmark, the Netherlands, and Finland) coarse-wool sheep are raised essentially for meat and sheepskins. In warm climates (India, Algeria, Tunisia, and Iraq) primarily fat-tailed varieties are raised for their wool and meat. Sheep raising primarily to produce lambs is well developed in Iran, Afghanistan, southwestern Africa, and some European countries.

The wool of coarse-wool sheep is used to produce coarse cloth, carpets, fulled and knitted articles, and felts. Lambskins from the lambing breeds are used in the production of collars, hats, and coats. Sheepskins are used to make sheepskin coats, fur jackets and coats, and various leather items. The meat of sheep (mutton) is a valuable food product. Sheep milk is used to produce various cheeses.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.