Coast Artillery


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Coast Artillery

 

a form of maritime artillery set up on a coast. Its purpose is to do combat with hostile surface vessels in the coastal zone; it may also be used to destroy land targets. Coast artillery developed considerably in the middle of the 19th century with the appearance of armored ships; its armament began to include naval guns. In the navy of the USSR, coast artillery is equipped with radar and fire-control devices. The main fire subunit is the artillery battery, which is armed with heavy-, medium-, and small-caliber artillery mounts. Coast artillery includes fixed (turret-housed and shield-protected) and mobile batteries. Turreted batteries (heavy-caliber guns) are set up in armored turrets; shield batteries (medium- and small-caliber artillery mounts) are set up on open sites and have armored shields that protect personnel and gun mechanisms from strikes by shell fragments. Mobile batteries may have guns mounted on special railroad flatcars (very-heavy-caliber guns) or may be on mechanical traction.

B. I. SERGEENKO

References in periodicals archive ?
As for jointness, the Interwar Period (1919-1941) saw increased fighting at the bureaucratic level between the Army, Coast Artillery, Air Service (after 1926, the Air Corps), and antiaircraft artillery, especially as the economy sank into the Great Depression.
Covers history of air defense from days of coast artillery to present.
Coast Artillery 1815-1914, Roger F Sarty, Museum Restoration Service, Canada, 1988
Lemnitzer (August 29, 1899); graduated from West Point and received his commission in the Coast Artillery (1920); served at Fort Monroe, Virginia and in Rhode Island (1921); served in Philippines (1921-1926) before returning to West Point as an instructor (1926-1930); after further service in the Philippines and elsewhere, he was again an instructor at West Point (1934-1935); and graduated from the Command and General Staff School (1936); an instructor at the Coast Artillery School (1936-1939); graduated from the Army War College (1940); assigned to staff duty with Coast Artillery units in the southern U.S.
Fort Amador housed the Coast Artillery units that worked the big guns at Fort Grant and Fort Amador.
Maclin enlisted in the coast artillery early last summer and after remaining at Jefferson Barracks and several encampments along the Atlantic coast, he was dispatched for overseas duty ...
The Bataan Death March holds special significance for New Mexico because many US troops then serving in Bataan were from the state's 200th and 515th Coast Artillery of the National Guard.
Ultimately, the Act of July 1918 established the rank and grade of warrant officer as the Coast Artillery Corps created the Army Mine Planter.
He was an army veteran of World War II, serving with the 282nd Coast Artillery Battalion.
On September 16 that year, the 251st Coast Artillery Anti-Aircraft Regiment was called to federal service and was sent to Hawaii on November 1.
Raymond served in the Army Coast Artillery for three years and in the Navy for six years.