Coat of Mail


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Coat of Mail

 

ancient and medieval defensive armor to protect the body. In a narrow sense, the term referred to a form of chain armor, although the latter differed from a coat of mail by having smaller rings and closer interweaving.

References in periodicals archive ?
Editor Michael Neill notes that "[p]resumably Cassio is wearing beneath his doublet a protective coat of mail (or 'privy coat') ...
habreioun (OED) variant spelling of habergeon, in 1380 quote at jack, a coat of mail or armor
His new rights, under a 1454 Act, also permit Freemen to possess a coat of mail, a bow and a sword.
It is, of course, a coat of mail. Nicholas Howe believes vestis is a term for a corselet in colloquial Latin.