Coccidioides immitis

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Coccidioides immitis

[‚käk·sid·ē¦ȯi‚dēz i′mīd·əs or i′mēd·əs]
(medicine)
A mold primarily found in desert soil that converts into spherules containing endospores when growing within the body and that causes coccidioidomycosis or San Joaquin valley fever.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fungal lung infections in immunocompromised individuals are caused predominantly by Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Histoplasma, Mucor, and rarely, Candida organisms.
Cal/OSHA's investigation found that Underground Construction did not evaluate the hazard of performing digging work in areas known to contain the coccidioides fungal spores.
Valley fever is caused by inhalation of Coccidioides spores, and even one spore can cause disease (Huang, Bristow, Shafir, & Sorvillo, 2012).
Coccidioidomycosis, also known as Valley fever, is a disease of growing public health concern and is caused by 2 closely related fungal species, Coccidioides immitis and C.
A rather rare finding in pulmonary imaging, the cavity formation may result from bacterial infections such as microaerophilic streptococci, viridans streptococci, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, Acinetobacter species, Escherichia coli, Legionella species, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Nocardia asteroides, mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nontuberculous mycobacteria and Mycobacterium avium complex, fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Coccidioides, Aspergillus and mucormycosis, parasites such as Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus genus, and viral infections such as papilloma virus [1,2].
Coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) is an infectious disease caused by inhalation of Coccidioides spores; approximately 40% of infected persons experience signs and symptoms including fever, cough, fatigue, chest pain, shortness of breath, and rash.
Effects of recombinant gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor on in-vitro interactions of human mononuclear phagocytes with Coccidioides immitis.
Five days after bronchoscopy, Coccidioides antibody by complement fixation (CF) assay returned positive at 1:8, Coccidioides IgM by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was positive, and Coccidioides IgG by ELISA was negative.
Coccidioidomycosis, commonly referred to as valley fever, is caused by Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii, two nearly identical species of pathogenic fungi most commonly found in southern Arizona, central California, southern New Mexico, and West Texas.
Blood and sputum cultures, autoimmune serologic tests, and serologic tests for Coccidioides and Cryptococcus were negative.
The fungal conidia were round structures approximately 30-40 micrometers in diameter with 2 micrometers of thick pale basophilic cell walls and heterogeneous amorphous pale amphophilic central material, consistent with immature Coccidioides immitis spherules (Figure 1).