Wigan

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Wigan

(wĭg`ən), metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 88,725), N England, located in the Manchester metropolitan area on the Douglas River. Wigan has a wide variety of industries, including electrical engineering, food processing, mail order, and the manufacture of paper, glass, fiber products, and textiles.

Wigan is thought to have been the site of the Roman station Coccium. In the Middle Ages, it was an important market town. It was long noted for the manufacture of pottery and pewter and for bell founding. There were ironworks in the 19th cent. Its Church of All Saints has a Norman tower.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Wigan

 

a city in Great Britain, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester (until 1974, it was located in Lancashire). Situated on the Douglas River and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. Population, 93,000 (1974). Wigan’s industrial development is connected with the Lancashire coalfield. Industries include coal mining, machine building, including the production of telephone and telegraph equipment, and the manufacture of cotton textiles.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wigan

1. an industrial town in NW England, in Wigan unitary authority, Greater Manchester: former coal-mining centre. Pop.: 81 203 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NW England, in Greater Manchester. Pop.: 303 800 (2003 est.). Area: 199 sq. km (77 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005