Coccoidea


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Coccoidea

[kä′kȯid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A superfamily of homopteran insects belonging to the Sternorrhyncha; includes scale insects and mealy bugs.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Coccoidea

 

a suborder of insects of the order Jugatae. Body length, usually 1–7 mm. The females are underdeveloped, wingless, often immobile, and have waxy coverings; their colonies resemble lichens. The males usually have a pair of wings (are rarely wingless) and are motile. The females and larvae suck the juices of plants; adult males do not feed. Armored scales (Diaspididae), soft scales (Lecaniidae), scale insects (Coccidae), and cushion scales belong to the Coccoidea. There are approximately 7,000 species, distributed worldwide, particularly heavily in the tropics. The USSR has more than 600 species. Many Coccoidea damage predominantly subtropical and southern fruit crops. Some require quarantine. There are beneficial species, used for obtaining shellac and carmine.

REFERENCE

Borkhsenius, N. S. Chervetsy i shchitovki SSSR (Coccoidea). (Opredelitel’ po faune SSSR, 32.) Moscow-Leningrad, 1950.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrary to the groups cited above, the phloem-sucking insects (as Psylloidea, Coccoidea and Aphididae) induce galls with hypertrophied phloem bundles (Fig.
(10.) Yair Ben-Dov, A Systematic Catalogue of Eight Scale Insect Families (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) of the World, Boston, MA: Elsevier, 2006, 211.
Acropyga and Azteca ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) with scale insects (Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea): 20 million years of intimate symbiosis.