coccolith

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Related to Coccoliths: Coccosphere, Acritarchs

coccolith

[′käk·ə‚lith]
(botany)
One of the small, interlocking calcite plates covering members of the Coccolithophorida.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2.) P Ziveri, B De Bernardi, K Baumann, H Stoll and P Mortyn, "Sinking of Coccolith Carbonate and Potential Contribution to Organic Carbon Ballasting in the Deep Ocean," Deep-Sea Res.
Chalk is a fine-grained carbonate rock constituted mostly of coccolith tests and characterized by a wide range of porosities and low permeabilities.
Distribution of coccoliths in surface sediments of the south-eastern South Atlantic Ocean: ecology, preservation and carbonate contribution.
A comparison of water samples and sediments across a variety of locations has shown that the weight of individual coccoliths (mainly those of Emiliania huxleyi, the most common coccolithophore species, and Gephyrocapsa) increases as seawater [C[O.sub.3.sup.2-]] increases (Beaufort et al., 2011).
Coccoliths are formed almost exclusively of calcium carbonate, as most magnesium is expelled by metabolic processes within the cells, whereas foraminiferal shells contain a much higher concentration of magnesium.
(1980): Supplementary modification and introduction of code numbers to the low-latitude coccolith biostratigraphic zonation (Bukry, 1973;1975).
Nicholls (1979), using X-ray emission spectra, has shown that the scales are composed of silica, but not calcified, and hence do not represent coccoliths.
Nannoplankton fruto the Galapagos Islands: Michaelsarsia elegans Gran and Haloppapus adriaticus Schiller (coccolithophorids) with special reference to coccoliths and their unmineralized comoponents.
The most important group of autotrophic and planktonic haptophytes, important primary producers, is without doubt the coccolithophorids, whose cells are covered with scales of calcium carbonate called coccoliths. Most of these cells do not possess functional flagella.
The sedimentary origin of the calcareous components is proved by the presence of coccoliths, fossils of marine algae that lived in past geological eras but not at present (Danin et al., 1989).
Diatoms fix carbon dioxide, but produce little DMS, whereas coccoliths produce DMS, but also release carbon dioxide.