Cochlearia


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Cochlearia

 

a genus of plants of the family Cruciferae. They are perennial, biennial, or annual herbs with simple leaves. The lower leaves are arranged in a rosette. The flowers, which are white or lilac, are in racemes. The fruit is a globose or ellipsoid silicle; the seeds are small.

There are approximately 25 species, distributed in the arctic and temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Six species are found in the USSR—in the arctic, Baltic Region, and Carpathians. The species Cochlearia arctica is a succulent plant with white flowers and long-petioled, ovoid or cordate radical leaves that resemble spoons; it is found along the seashore and on clayey and sandy soils. The leaves, which contain an essential oil and vitamin C, are used for food and as an antiscorbutic agent. C. a rctica is sometimes cultivated like scurvy grass (C. officinalis), which grows in Western Europe on the northern coasts and in the mountains.

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Effect of NaCl on lipid metabolism in roots of the halotolerant species Cochlearia anglica.
Hoffman (1968, as cited in Elvebakk 1994) described an Oxyrio-Saxifragetum cernuae association from bird cliffs in eastern Svalbard, where Oxyria digyna, Saxifraga cernua, and Cochlearia officinialis were considered to be the species most favored by manuring.
Comparative molecular studies on the genetic diversity of an ex situ garden collection and its source population of the critically endangered Polish endemic plant Cochlearia polonica E.
Dail eraill oedd yn arfer cael eu bwyta yn y gwanwyn oedd dail y llwylys (Cochlearia officinalis; common scurvygrass).
Wrth ochr y llwybr roedd y llwylys (Cochlearia officinalis; common scurveygrass) a llaeth y gaseg (Cardamine pratensis; cuckoo flower) ac uwch fy mhen, roedd ehedydd yn canu.
Aelod arall ydi'r llwylys cyffredin neu'r dail sgyrfi (Cochlearia officinalis; scurvy-grass).
In addition, polar bears have been observed to consume vegetation, both marine (e.g., Laminaria) and terrestrial (e.g., grass, berries, Cochlearia) (Russell, 1975; Derocher et al., 1993; own observations).