coercion


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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
This concern about nuclear coercion was specifically invoked in the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review that stated, "Their provocative behavior has increased instability in their regions and could generate pressures in neighboring countries for considering nuclear deterrent options of their own." (2) Todd S.
The study investigates how the notion of coercion affected how these trials were conducted and how it influenced media coverage of the case.
These are known as informal or covert coercion (Molodynski, Rugkasa & Burns, 2010; Sjostrand & Helgesson, 2008).
Sexual coercion has evolved to be a major public health challenge owing to its negative association with social and health outcomes.
The right to self determination of Kashmiris can not be suppressed through state coercion, he added.
One of the most significant points of disagreement between Rawls and Kant is on taxation and the conditions under which the state is justified in using coercion to expropriate property from the rich and distribute it to the poor.
El ultimo bloque del libro pone a prueba la propuesta tipologica planteada, aplicandola al estudio de otros escenarios y estructuras de coercion. Analiza, asi, los modelos coercitivos de regimenes autoritarios tan diversos como la Argentina del autodenominado <<Proceso de Reorganizacion Nacional>> (1976-1982), la Republica Democratica Alemana o la Sudafrica del apartheid.
When you look at the old-school tactics that salespeople use, they're closer to coercion than influence.
McKay goes into great detail in outlining the meaning of "coercion." He goes on to examine coercive attempts during three American political administrations: Bush the elder, Clinton, and Bush the junior--outlining their successes and failures.
The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: What constitutes coercion in family planning policy and program management and how do we use lessons of the past to prevent future instances of coercion?
Coercion is coercion; rights violations are rights violations; the welfare state relies on coercive, rights-violating confiscations of wealth; and conservatives' fantasies and special pleadings to the contrary will not change these facts.
Rick Perry on Friday on charges of abuse of power and coercion as part of an ethics inquiry into his veto of funding for the state's public integrity unit.