Cogeneration


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cogeneration

[‚kō‚jen·ə′rā·shən]
(mechanical engineering)
The simultaneous on-site generation of electric energy and process steam or heat from the same plant.

Cogeneration

The simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy (power) and useful thermal energy from the same fuel/energy source such as oil, coal, gas, biomass, or solar panels. Conventionally, heat is emitted through cooling towers or flue gas is lost, but cogeneration makes use of that heat. A cogeneration plant is often referred to as a combined heat and power plant.

Cogeneration

The sequential production of electricity and thermal energy in the form of heat or steam, or useful mechanical work, such as shaft power, from the same fuel source. Cogeneration projects are typically represented by two basic types of power cycles, topping or bottoming. The topping cycle has the widest industrial application.

The topping cycle utilizes the primary energy source to generate electrical or mechanical power. Then the rejected heat, in the form of useful thermal energy, is supplied to the process. The cycle consists of a combustion turbine-generator, with the turbine exhaust gases directed into a waste-heat-recovery boiler that converts the exhaust gas heat into steam which drives a steam turbine, extracting steam to the process while driving an electric generator. This cycle is commonly referred to as a combined cycle arrangement. Combustion turbine-generators, steam turbine-generator sets, and reciprocating internal-combustion-engine generators are representative of the major equipment components utilized in a topping cycle. See Generator, Steam turbine, Turbine

A bottoming cycle has the primary energy source applied to a useful heating process. The reject heat from the process is then used to generate electrical power. The typical bottoming cycle directs waste heat from a process to a waste-heat-recovery boiler that converts this thermal energy to steam which is supplied to a steam turbine, extracting steam to the process and also generating electrical power. See Electric power generation

Cogeneration for building and district space heating and cooling purposes consists of producing electricity and sequentially utilizing useful energy in the form of steam, hot water, or direct exhaust gases. The two most common heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning cycles are the vapor compression cycle and the absorption cycle. See Air conditioning, Central heating and cooling

cogeneration

In a building, the on-site electric power generation utilizing both the electrical power and steam or hot water which is developed; in some municipalities in the US, if excess electrical power is generated, it may be sold to the utility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tokyo, Feb 10, 2010 - (JCN) - Marubeni Corporation has been awarded a Contract for EPC (Engineering, Procurement & Construction) for the Biomass and Clean Coal Cogeneration Plant by TP Utilities (TPU), a subsidiary of Tuas Power, one of the major power companies in Singapore.
regulatory policies favors inefficient centralized power production and penalizes or blocks decentralized alternatives." Casten points out that utilities have generally opposed cogeneration. "The utility sector is unlike the rest of the economy.
Germany's own assessment of its potential indicates that over 50% of its current electricity could be supplied using high efficiency cogeneration. "Germany has set itself a target of doubling cogeneration, to 24%, of its electricity supply by 2020.
The study evaluated alternative fuels, solar panels, and cogeneration. Cogeneration uses an internal power plant to simultaneously generate both electricity and useful heat.
Jack Kelly, director of project management and purchasing at Central Connecticut, explains that despite its technical-sounding name, the cogeneration process is actually pretty simple to digest.
MCV is a gas-fired cogeneration project in the United States which is capable of producing up to 1,560 megawatts of electricity and up to 1.35 million pounds per hour of process steam for industrial use.
The Federal Government promotes decentralised cogeneration with the CHP Law, which came into force on 1 January 2009.
The cogeneration plant produces 5 MW of electric power and also satisfies the needs for thermal energy of the entire site with around four MW.
Most of the thousands of cogeneration plants operating across the United States and Canada are small facilities operated by non-utility companies and by institutions like universities and the military.
The Osaka-based gas utility said it has succeeded in developing a cogeneration system with a durability of up to 40,000 hours of operation, equivalent to four or five years of home use when an average household is assumed to use the system for 6,000 to 8,000 hours per year.
The principal technical advantage of cogeneration systems is their ability to improve the efficiency of fuel use in the production of electrical and thermal energy.
Marubeni is the first Japanese company to enter the renewable energy and cogeneration business with distributed generation facilities.