cognate

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cognate

related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cognate

[‚käg‚nāt]
(geology)
Pertaining to contemporaneous fractures in a system with regard to time of origin and deformational type.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, after a careful look at the overall results obtained for this particular class of cognates, it can be noticed that they only exhibit 81.89 average normalised frequency of occurrence in the COC, thus supporting Mittwoch's (1998) hypothesis about its scarce use in present-day British English.
53): "I used the term DI-ODES to describe 'poems' made from pairs of short and long vowels of a word, and I used them together, singly or in groups, as poems, phrases, cognates, etc.
In terms of academic English, native Spanish-speakers have an advantage when it comes to using cognates. Because many of the words we associate with academic English have Greco-Roman roots, it is common to find many cognates between these academic English words and more common words in other Romance languages, such as Spanish.
The etymology of each word in Turkish language will be extracted and compared with its counterpart in Urdu language in order to contrast the origins of both terms and verify whether in fact they are loanwords received from the same language directly they have been received through another language or rather the terms are cognates.
Probably the original form was *liwi, and the Finno-Ugric cognates pointing to *luwi have undergone a sporadic labialization of the vowel that was caused by the following *w.
According to the existence of cognates in related languages it is possible to divide stems of contemporary language into historical layers.
The purpose of this paper is to collect information on cognate processing in Croatian speakers of Global English and add it to the body of world literature dealing with cognates.
Vanhove (2017) hypothesized that speakers of Belgian Dutch who are familiar with a three-gender substandard variety would make use of this additional masculine/feminine distinction when assigning gender to German nouns: compared to speakers of Netherlandic Dutch, Belgian speakers of Dutch were expected to more often assign feminine gender to German words whose cognates are feminine in substandard Belgian Dutch and masculine gender to words with masculine cognates in substandard Belgian Dutch.
Etymological considerations remain important in Ugaritic lexicography, and the editors have again made generally judicious choices in their citation of cognates for most roots and words.
He occasionally modifies the rigid alphabetization of entries, and when descriptive complexities dictate, puts obvious cognates in separate entries, but pools them under generic headings when descriptive simplicities allow.