cognitive anthropology


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cognitive anthropology

the study that seeks to use the formal methods of LOGIC and LINGUISTICS in characterizing fields of culture, and the minds formed in those cultures. In the 1960s, the study of cultures moved away from tracking generalized belief systems (e.g. religion) towards the everyday or mundane classifications (or taxonomies) of things, persons and actions within particular cultures. Anthropology began to attend in detail to the way in which people's cognitions, their thoughts, reasonings and judgements, are necessarily bound up in their social activities. This was in line with developments generally in the social sciences, with increasing interest in what people ‘know and think’ as central to social organization. The ETHNOSCIENCES, in looking at categorizations of nature in non-Western thought, have had as deep an influence on the development of cognitive anthropology, as has linguistics. The central proposal has been that anthropology can use formal methods, rather than either those modelled on an empiricist reading of natural science, or on the uncontrolled interpretation associated with the humanities. The outcome is formal or quasi-formal statements of the rules and systemic alternatives, normally with reference to small fields of a culture. See also COMPONENTIAL ANALYSIS, SAPIRWHORF HYPOTHESIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are the Coral Gardens are losing their magic: the social and cultural impact of climate change and overpopulation for the Trobriand Islanders, visions of a village in Papua New Guinea, the early field and commercial recordings of Kuman music: research using repatriated music in Papua New Guinea and recent threats to cultural diversity, challenges and profits of interdisciplinary fieldwork in linguistic and cognitive anthropology, and anthropology meets psychology.
It is a book good to think with and is an important contribution to the study of folk taxonomy and indigenous knowledge, cognitive anthropology, Eastern Indonesian (Indonesian) studies, zoology, and the study of environmental animism.
The development of cognitive anthropology. Cambridge University Press.
Part II introduces perspectives on body language from various disciplines including psycholinguistics, cognitive linguistics, neuropsychology, cognitive anthropology, social psychology, and ethnography.
An important assumption of cognitive anthropology is that in the process of repeated social transmission, cultural programs come to take forms which have a good fit to the natural capacities of the human brain.
Edwin van Leeuwen from the Comparative Cognitive Anthropology Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, said that orphaned chimpanzees had more difficulties to successfully coordinate their social play interactions.
The second article, by Naran Bilik, analyses the nuanced roles of Chinggis Khan worship in the troubled Mongol identity, from the vantage point of cognitive anthropology. By contextualising the ritualised worship of Chinggis Khan with respect to ethnic relations (minzu guanxi) and nation-building, this article shows how the symbolism of Chinggis Khan is fabricated, manipulated and ritualised in a complex interaction of geopolitical power and constantly changing landscape of ethnicity.
Some of these works are fine examples of pioneering research in ethnoarchaeology and cognitive anthropology. He also published two other tomes.
Cognitive anthropology lies within cultural anthropology, in which scholars seek to explain patterns of shared knowledge, cultural innovation and transmission over time and space using the methods and theories of the cognitive sciences (especially experimental psychology and evolutionary biology).
His dissertation was an analysis of Benuaq Dayak autochthonous religion using methods from ethnolinguistics, cognitive anthropology, and historical linguistics and is based on ethnographic data collected during fieldwork in East Kalimantan, 2004-2008.
Paper, 24.90[yen]--The forms of linguistic articulation and expressivity in contextualized (and situated) cognition and knowledge production have been the focus of a lot interesting work in philosophical anthropology as well as in cognitive science (including cognitive anthropology) over the past forty years or so.
The Development of Cognitive Anthropology. Nueva York: Cambridge University Press.

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