cognitive architecture

(redirected from Cognitive architectures)

cognitive architecture

(architecture)
A computer architecure involving non-deterministic, multiple inference processes, as found in neural networks. Cognitive architectures model the human brain and contrast with single processor computers.

The term might also refer to software architectures, e.g. fuzzy logic.

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 2 reprises Laird and Wray's requirements for general cognitive architectures and provides a framework for that basis.
Transfer in the context of cognitive architectures tends to communicate more structured skills.
Cognitive architectures provide helpful theoretical frameworks for representing tasks, but most, such as Soar (Laird 2012; Laird, Newell, and Rosenbloom 1987), emphasize encoding knowledge as symbols.
We can state several reasons for the importance of generative narrative cognition in cognitive architectures. First, a story is a universal information format that integrates various informational elements, including events, entities, relationships, abstract concepts, intents, goals, emotions, nonverbal information (e.g., memories of visual images), and hypothetical events.
Among cognitive architectures, ACT-R (adaptive character of thought rational) has been studied for a long time and has good evaluation.
Advanced Research on Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures
The structure of this article is as follows: Section 2 presents some work done in the field of cognitive architectures dealing with emotions and the search for appropriate behaviors.
The project's goal is to build neuromorphic computing systems that use the same principles of computation and cognitive architectures as the brain.
A shortcoming of the text has to do with the relationship between Von Eckardt's chapter and the following contribution from Thagard on cognitive architectures. Thagard covers well some historically important approaches to understanding mental computations, specifically rule-based digital computation (AKA GOFAI) and connectionism.
Bear in mind that the data in this article are specific to the cognitive architectures of the individuals tested in this study; they should not be generalized.
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