developmental disability

(redirected from Cognitive disabilities)
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developmental disability

[də¦vel·əp‚ment·əl ‚dis·ə‚bil·əd·ē]
(medicine)
A substantial handicap or impairment originating before the age of 18 that may be expected to continue indefinitely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, researchers and practitioners do not have a clear national picture of the extent to which students with the most significant cognitive disabilities have access to the general curriculum in the context of learning with their peers without disabilities.
Based on our analysis plan, we further divided types of disabilities into two existing OK.DRS categories, including cognitive disabilities and non-cognitive disabilities, to examine moderator effects.
The child was born with cognitive disabilities and will need lifelong care.
In this work, learning disabilities are defined to encompass intellectual impairment and cognitive disabilities, physical and sensory impairments, and differences associated with the autistic spectrum.
The software helps individuals with cognitive disabilities build and manage visual schedules for a day, week, month, or longer.
Topics included Total Errors Allowed, How Do You Handle Stress, Caring and Supporting People with Cognitive Disabilities, Preanalytic Sample Handling, and AMTrax Online CE Tracking.
Digital content does not ensure access to instructional material by individuals with cognitive disabilities. Because of the broad number of disorders within the classification of cognitive disabilities, identifying the barriers these individuals encounter while interacting with digital content is difficult.
How should the interests of people with cognitive disabilities be represented politically?
There have no been studies of the prevalence or type and severity of visual impairments (both blindness and low vision) in adults with cognitive disabilities in the Federal Republic of Germany to date.
The difficulty of balancing the risks and benefits of cosmetic surgery in children prompts consideration of whether there ought to be additional limitations on parental decision-making involving cosmetic surgery in children with cognitive disabilities. Some might argue that if the benefits are exclusively psychosocial and the child will forever lack the cognitive awareness to appreciate them, then only the parent will benefit from the surgery.
(http://www.imaginecolorado.org) provides support services to people with developmental delays and cognitive disabilities in Colorado's Boulder and Broomfield counties.

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