cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

[¦käg·nəd·iv ′dīs·ən·əns]
(psychology)
Psychological conflict that results from incongruous beliefs and attitudes held simultaneously.

cognitive dissonance

the experience of competing, opposing or contradictory thoughts, attitudes or actions leading to a feeling of tension and the need to achieve consonance. The term was introduced by Festinger (1957). In his definition dissonant cognitions exist when Belief A implies the negation of Belief B. For example, ‘Smoking causes lung cancer’ is dissonant with ‘I smoke’. The dissonance can be reduced in a variety of ways, either by adjusting Belief A or Belief B. Belief A could be adjusted by disregarding medical reports that confirm the belief and by paying particular attention to sceptical reports. Belief B can be adjusted by smoking less, or smoking tobacco of a low carcinogenic type.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, in this study we took cognitive dissonance theory and students' evaluation of teaching and courses in areas of high and low achievement.
We present and discuss the findings in light of the relevant literature and cognitive dissonance theory.
Double forced compliance: A new paradigm in cognitive dissonance theory.
According to this principal of cognitive dissonance theory if a person feels responsible for all consequences dissonance greatly occurs.
Brehm & Cohen (1962) urged to undertake more studies to detect the relationship between personality tendencies & inclinations and motivation & reduction of dissonance, as they see that there are many pros can be obtained from both the personality theory and cognitive dissonance theory if studied together.
In the following section, I explore these possibilities through the framework of cognitive dissonance theory.
1969), "Can cognitive dissonance theory explain consumer behavior?
Cognitive dissonance theory holds that our reactions to these sorts of psychological stimuli tend to fall somewhere along a continuum on which each point represents a strategy for returning our consciousnesses into cognitive balance (Huegler, 2006; Van Overalle & Jordens, 2002).
According to cognitive dissonance theory (Festinger, 1957), one should work to reduce the dissonance and if it is too late to avoid the behavior, one would modify one's beliefs to account for or justify one's behavior.
In this package comprised of a facilitator's guide and 10 staple-bound participant workbooks, Stice (Oregon Research Institute) and Presnell (psychology, Southern Methodist University) outline a two-part group intervention program, based on cognitive dissonance theory, for adolescent and college-aged women at risk for developing eating disorders.
In tracing the development of cognitive dissonance theory, he addresses the motivational property of dissonance, shifting models and understandings of the role of the self in dissonance theory, and issues of culture and race.
To reduce addicts' intrinsic motivation and then induce them to engage in attitude-discrepant behavior could be done by borrowing from cognitive dissonance theory.

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