cohort

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cohort

Biology a taxonomic group that is a subdivision of a subclass (usually of mammals) or subfamily (of plants)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cohort

a group of persons possessing a common characteristic, such as being born in the same year, or entering school on the same date. The term is usually used in making generalizations derived from quantitative data (see QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES).
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cohort

 

(Latin cohors ). (1) A tactical subdivision of a legion in ancient Rome from the second century B.c. A legion had ten cohorts, each with from 360 to 600 men.

(2) Figuratively, a tightly knit group of people.

(3) A biological classification category that unites several related orders. For instance, the cohort of the Unguiculata includes the orders Insectívora, Dermoptera, Chiroptera, and Primates.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cohort

[′kō‚hȯrt]
(statistics)
A group of individuals who experience a significant event, such as birth, during the same period of time.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three large, prospective, longitudinal cohort studies have been published since the meta-analysis.
Furthermore, several new prospective cohort studies on this topic had been published recently, and the results of these new cohort studies are inconsistent too.24,25 Therefore, it is necessary to perform an update meta-analysis to quantitatively summarize the association between coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer risk.
Biased exposure-health effect estimates from selection cohort studies: are environmental studies at particular risk?
Another major area in which cohort studies provide material for economists is the study of gender issues in the labour market, represented here by the paper by Dex and Bukodi on women's occupational histories3 After an outline of the contributors' results, the reader will find more information about the history, content and future of the studies.
Two controlled prospective cohort studies to verify these promising retrospective data have been started in colorectal and pancreatic cancer in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.
However, the data suggest a negative association in cohort studies, show no association for stroke caused by bleeding in the brain or for stroke-related deaths, and indicate no elevation in risk for ever-users.
The ACSR contains over 100,000 specimens collected from cohort studies, clinical trials, and other research sources (including international research).
Etminan and his associates searched the published literature since 1966 and identified six cohort studies and three case-control studies of NSAIDs and Alzheimer's disease, and five cohort studies and three case-control studies of aspirin and Alzheimer's disease.
The best studies of the alleged link are called historical cohort studies because they rely on complete medical records for entire populations of women, over decades.
To better understand what helps people stay healthy, scientists do cohort studies. A cohort is simply a group of people who are alike in some way--such as having HIV infection.
Because the true incidence of meningococcal infection among coinfected patients is unknown, future cohort studies will have to establish the impact of coinfection with HIV and HCV on the risk for meningococcal infection.