Cohousing

(redirected from Cohousing Communities)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Cohousing

Development pattern in which multiple (typically 8–30) privately owned houses or housing units are clustered together with some commonly owned spaces, such as a common workshop or greenhouse. Automobiles are typically kept to the perimeter of the community, creating a protected area within the community where children can play. Usually, residents are closely involved in all aspects of the development, from site selection to financing and design.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cohousing communities can be inter-generational, welcoming anyone of any age and any family structure, or specifically to cater for people who are older or are communities of common interest.
These issues have made alternatives such as cohousing communities, which began in Denmark in the 1960s, more attractive to people with disabilities.
one of the largest cohousing communities in the country, with about 170 residents.
My survey of attitudes in fifty North American cohousing communities shows that this newer form of cohousing (its second wave) is a form of intentional community and does display some utopian tendencies.
This fully-illustrated (unfortunately the photos are only in black and white) manual combines nuts-and-bolts practical considerations and design ideas with extensive case studies of dozens of diverse cohousing communities across Europe and North America.
Beginning in Denmark and spreading to many other places we have seen the rise of cohousing communities in which people own their own homes but share mutual amenities.
All cohousing communities utilize some form of consensus decision making.
In this article, readers are introduced to how cohousing communities work and why they are such a vital resource in the ongoing challenge of offering those with disabilities the same human rights--like safe, cost effective, stable, and chosen home environments--that are afforded those without disabilities.
First created in Denmark in the late 1960s, cohousing communities are developments where residents live in private homes, but have common areas where social activities like meals are shared with neighbors.
It will include a tour of several completed cohousing communities, an overview of the basic steps involved in taking your project from vision to reality, and descriptions of several elder community options now available.
At least three senior cohousing communities are in various stages of development in Davis, California; Abingdon, Virginia, and Boulder, Colorado, and more are on the drawing boards.
So Graham Meltzer's book, Sustainable Community: Learning From the Cohousing Model--which asserts that residents of cohousing communities with small houses and shared common spaces are generally happier--is timely.