Colchis

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Colchis

(kŏl`kĭs), ancient country on the eastern shore of the Black Sea and in the Caucasus region. Centered about the fertile valley of the Phasis River (the modern Rion), Colchis corresponds to the present-day region of MingreliaMingrelia
, lowland region, W Georgia, bordering the Black Sea. Tea and grapes are the chief products. Poti is the main port. The Colchis of the ancients, Mingrelia was a vassal principality (with Zugdidi as capital) under the Ottoman Empire. It was annexed to Russia in 1803.
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 in Georgia. In Greek legend it was the home of Aeëtes and Medea, the land where the Golden Fleece was sought by JasonJason,
in Greek mythology, son of Aeson. When Pelias usurped the throne of Iolcus and killed (or imprisoned) Aeson and most of his descendants, Jason was smuggled off to the centaur Chiron, who reared him secretly on Mt. Pelion.
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 and the Argonauts; modern inhabitants of Svanetia, inland from Mingrelia, still use sheepskins to trap gold grains and flakes in streams. Greek trading posts were established in Colchis, but the land remained independent until conquered (c.100 B.C.) and held briefly by Mithradates VI of Pontus. After the time of Trajan to the end of the Roman Empire, Rome exerted considerable influence on the region.

Colchis

 

(Russian, Kolkhida; local name, Egrisi), the Greek name for an ancient region of western Georgia. The name was given by writers in the early first millennium B.C. to the territory of the southeastern and eastern Black Sea region, after the Colchians, who lived there. In the sixth century B.C., the Greek colonies of Dioscurias and Phasis arose there. In the sixth to second centuries B.C., the Colchian Kingdom occupied Colchis, which later became part of the various states of Georgia.

Colchis

an ancient country on the Black Sea south of the Caucasus; the land of Medea and the Golden Fleece in Greek mythology
References in periodicals archive ?
366-67), an unnavigable and uncivilized ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) sea, was dominated by the piracy of the Heniochi, Colchians, Tauri, and Bosporans until the classis Pontica pacified these waters and 3000 'hoplites' manned the coasts.
49) Josephus, however, raises the specter of piracy--a perpetual maritime phenomenon like death and taxes--naming the Heniochi, Colchians, Tauri, Bosporans and the peoples around Lake Maeotis.
As part of her own family history, then, Phaedra's Colchian cousin looms large alongside Pasiphae as yet another (maternal and stepmaternal) figure gone bad.
74) Along with Pasiphae, the figure of Medea represents an ungovernable, unspeakable 'second nature' for her in Seneca's play; one mother's murderous rage complementing the other's perverse desire in a rhetorical and psychic continuum linking Cretan and Colchian, zoophilia and infanticide.
As the Colchian stepmother defeated by Theseus, Medea also has resonances of another barbarian mother-figure who silently haunts the play: the Amazon Antiope, Hippolytus's dead mother, against whom Theseus also exercised his masculine supremacy, although this time unjustly, as the Nurse suggests (coniugi castae, 226-7).
Did a Greek land nurture this man or Scythian Taurus or Colchian Phasis?
Increase your speed, Colchians, if you have any grief or anger over this deed.
Medea's enemy and former pupil, the bitter and jealous Agadema, ruthlessly criticized the behaviour of her fellow Colchians for constructing a mythology of their homeland that has nothing to do with the reality of their past.
Now to haughty Aeetes and all the Colchians had Medea's love been revealed and her deeds discovered.
In the Argonautica, the Colchians are rallied on the shore, and they, like Homer's Greeks, will swarm forth in great numbers in order to right the wrong to, or of, a woman.
Scholars have noted that Apollonius takes considerable pains to integrate his similes with the flow of his narrative, and the autumnal avalanche of quivering leaves is just the right image to convey the chaotic, yet directed movement of the mass of angry Colchians .
In Apollonius the reader encounters a mass of Colchians crowding along the banks of the river Phasis.