food irradiation

(redirected from Cold pasteurization)
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food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high pressure processing (HPP) is a technique that implements cold pasteurization through which a product that is recently sealed in its final package, are poured into a container, then subjected to a high level of isostatic pressure, transported by water.
High-pressure processing is a cold pasteurization technique that introduces filled and sealed packages into a vessel and subjects them to high water pressure.
"This suggests that atmospheric cold plasma treatment may achieve a cold pasteurization process for liquid foods to extend their shelf-life and improve safety."
This study examined the effect of cold pasteurization by electromagnetic waves (microwave) on liquid egg yolk and reduction of logarithmic amount of present aerobic mesophilic micro-organisms in samples, and compare it with current thermal methods (regular pasteurization).
Company provides cold pasteurization services to the food industry in the only refrigerated facility of its kind and has government approvals from FDA, USDA, FSIS, and APHIS.
The microbial counts of coconut water were expected to be zero after heat and cold pasteurization because of the low initial microbial load of coconut water.
Do you want to consume something that's been exposed to 1 kGy of radiation in the process of "electronic pasteurization" or "cold pasteurization?" While evidence suggests that this has no adverse effect on the quality of safety of food stocks, the public clearly has the right to know.
This sometimes controversial "cold pasteurization" process has been used to kill bacteria in meat department products and is being considered for use on seafood and dell meats.
Several food industry groups and other food irradiation proponents are seeking to change the labeling requirements and to allow the use of words such as "cold pasteurization" or "electronic pasteurization" instead of "irradiation" or "radiation," which sound so much like the dreaded "radioactive."
The Food and Drug Administration has begun a process that could liberalize the labeling of irradiated food and allow use of terms such as hotly debated alternative terms as "cold pasteurization." In an October 8 guidance document to industry, FDA laid out the procedural requirements for companies that seek agency approval of labeling language that differs from that currently required by the agency.
They also charge that the industry is glossing over concerns by shifting to terms such as cold pasteurization and electronic pasteurization and using irradiation to cover up less-than-adequate safety measures at the processing level.